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[Albion] Thank you so much to the fan who helped my autistic son yesterday...

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Reinelt12

Sick Note
Nov 8, 2006
1,290
Lichfield, United Kingdom
I'm glad you were able to get your son away from the situation, hopefully without any long lasting damage. Having two autistic grandchildren I can fully appreciate the issues you can have. I would love to take them to football but currently that is impossible.

Thanks, I don't believe it will have any lasting damage, and I will chat to him about it before we go to another game to make sure. Sad that you can't take your grandkids to football, although maybe the sensory room that's mentioned on this thread could help with that?
 


Reinelt12

Sick Note
Nov 8, 2006
1,290
Lichfield, United Kingdom
Not a problem! Glad you got out ok in the end.

Thanks again! I felt awful shouting about him being autistic - a) because I didn't want it to feel like we were entitled to get out more than anyone else, and b) didn't want to embarass him, although he is very open about his autism - but it was a situation where I felt he really needed to get out of there, and I haven't felt that before. Fair play to you and others for coming to his aid.
 

Commander

Members
Apr 28, 2004
11,821
London
Why are there so many autistic children around today? I’m sure this wasn’t the case when I was a kid, and I genuinely don’t think it was only a case of it not being diagnosed.

My son is fairly mildly autistic (I think, no confirmed diagnoses yet) but I know numerous people with autistic kids, and I’m sure this wasn’t the case 20 years ago.
 

Reinelt12

Sick Note
Nov 8, 2006
1,290
Lichfield, United Kingdom
One other thing I didn't mention which in hindsight I should have done for balance... on the way back to the car my wife was with my youngest making sure he was ok (She could see from the Saints end that things were kicking off, so even worse for her watching it and not being able to do anything), a BHA fan was being very aggressive and intimidating to both of them which made her feel threatened (I was with my elder son a few paces back). So ironically the mouthy fan was being threatening to one of our own fans, and a 12yr old kid at that!
 

H block

Members
Jul 10, 2003
1,345
Worthing
Why are there so many autistic children around today? I’m sure this wasn’t the case when I was a kid, and I genuinely don’t think it was only a case of it not being diagnosed.

My son is fairly mildly autistic (I think, no confirmed diagnoses yet) but I know numerous people with autistic kids, and I’m sure this wasn’t the case 20 years ago.

It wasn’t the case 20 years ago as we have learnt so much in the diagnosis and follow ups. My daughter is a key stage 1 teacher/leader and they are instrumental nowadays in helping parents into the recognition of the whole spectrum.
 
Why are there so many autistic children around today? I’m sure this wasn’t the case when I was a kid, and I genuinely don’t think it was only a case of it not being diagnosed.

My son is fairly mildly autistic (I think, no confirmed diagnoses yet) but I know numerous people with autistic kids, and I’m sure this wasn’t the case 20 years ago.

I had no idea what autism was when I was a child, I'd not heard of it. I'm 32 and it just wasn't diagnosed when I was younger.

My 3 year old son is autistic, he hasn't had the official diagnosis, but we're told "he has definite signs", he hasn't said a word yet, I'm hoping he will one day, he stims, he has huge melt downs (not just toddler tantrums, but a full on meltdown), repetitive movements. He also wakes up every night, without fail, at 2am for 1.5-2 hours thinking its party time wanting us all to hide under the covers, etc.

He's just the best little boy I could of wished for. He has an amazing smile, the best laugh.
 

Commander

Members
Apr 28, 2004
11,821
London
I had no idea what autism was when I was a child, I'd not heard of it. I'm 32 and it just wasn't diagnosed when I was younger.

My 3 year old son is autistic, he hasn't had the official diagnosis, but we're told "he has definite signs", he hasn't said a word yet, I'm hoping he will one day, he stims, he has huge melt downs (not just toddler tantrums, but a full on meltdown), repetitive movements. He also wakes up every night, without fail, at 2am for 1.5-2 hours thinking its party time wanting us all to hide under the covers, etc.

He's just the best little boy I could of wished for. He has an amazing smile, the best laugh.

Nor did I, but when you look back and remember the kids you grew up with, how many of them would you say were autistic? Very few for me, it just seems like a bit of a modern phenomenon.
 


Green Cross Code Man

Wunt be druv
Mar 30, 2006
18,060
Eastbourne
Nor did I, but when you look back and remember the kids you grew up with, how many of them would you say were autistic? Very few for me, it just seems like a bit of a modern phenomenon.
I don't think that is necessarily true. Kids who were autistic were generally sent to special schools, now there is much more integration and understanding. A lot are successful in primary with support and also go on to have great success in secondary.

Sent from my Pixel 6 using Tapatalk
 

Commander

Members
Apr 28, 2004
11,821
London
I think alot of autism was probably mis-diagnosed as ADHD.

Even that though. I just don’t think there was as much of it around. I can think of maybe one or two kids in my year at school (100 people ish) who you would today describe as autistic / ADHD. But I can think of at least 3 or 4 in my son’s year of 60, probably more. I’m sure it’s more prevalent today. Something to do with modern living, I expect, probably the amount of shit that we put in our bodies these days.
 

Harry Wilson's tackle

Harry Wilson's Tackle
Oct 8, 2003
40,665
Faversham
I think alot of autism was probably mis-diagnosed as ADHD.

And the related condition, Aspergers goes undiagnosed. I wasn't identified as being 'on the spectrum' till I was 62 years old. When I was 7 my parents were told I may need to be put in the 'backward' class (I was bored, so I mucked about). Yet I went on to Grammar school, BSc, PhD, more than 100 peer reviewed research papers, etc etc. I can't read people very well, especially on an internet forum, but my imperative to fight injustice (against me, and against anyone, everyone and anything) keeps me . . . engaged. Otherwise I'd retreat into my own space.

A perhaps surprising number of NSC posters are on the spectrum. Testing out ideas in the relative anonymity and safe space of a curated forum? Perhaps.

Apologies if I've ever duffed you up in any way you consider unreasonable.
 

Harry Wilson's tackle

Harry Wilson's Tackle
Oct 8, 2003
40,665
Faversham
Even that though. I just don’t think there was as much of it around. I can think of maybe one or two kids in my year at school (100 people ish) who you would today describe as autistic / ADHD. But I can think of at least 3 or 4 in my son’s year of 60, probably more. I’m sure it’s more prevalent today. Something to do with modern living, I expect, probably the amount of shit that we put in our bodies these days.

The careful ones would have kept their head down and mouth shut.

In my secondary school the selection process would have filtered out the overtly florid at 11 plus stage. Plenty of my junior school cohort were off the scale. At the grammar school, sure we had some odd characters, and I'd say that 30% of my class would have special dispensation, were it today. One is a famous BHA 'hooligan'. Lovely bloke, but with X Y and Z issues, none of which were ever diagnosed or addressed, I'll wager.
 
And the related condition, Aspergers goes undiagnosed. I wasn't identified as being 'on the spectrum' till I was 62 years old. When I was 7 my parents were told I may need to be put in the 'backward' class (I was bored, so I mucked about). Yet I went on to Grammar school, BSc, PhD, more than 100 peer reviewed research papers, etc etc. I can't read people very well, especially on an internet forum, but my imperative to fight injustice (against me, and against anyone, everyone and anything) keeps me . . . engaged. Otherwise I'd retreat into my own space.

A perhaps surprising number of NSC posters are on the spectrum. Testing out ideas in the relative anonymity and safe space of a curated forum? Perhaps.

Apologies if I've ever duffed you up in any way you consider unreasonable.

My sister calls me socially awkward, I hate big social get-togethers. I hated school, all that being popular nonsense. I liked to keep my social group at any time small, no bigger then 5. My Dad's very similar. I remember my 20th birthday, I'd recently moved out and the guys I lived with decided to throw a party, there was around 30 people there, in a tiny flat. I hated it, some on here call me an attention seeker, they couldn't be more wrong. My mum and sister are the complete opposite.

It's only recently after spotting the signs in my son, that I said to my mum I think I'm on the spectrum. Unsurprisingly, she disagreed. Probably because she doesn't want to think she missed something.

I watched a programme about Paddy McGuinnes and his 3 children the other day, and was unaware that you can do a kind of test online that rates the possibility if you're on the spectrum. Most people score under 16, but anything about 25 I think suggests you're on the spectrum. I scored 30. I'm not sure how accurate these things are, but apparently it was designed by some Cambridge professor that has studied autism for over 35 years.
 

Swansman

Pro-peace
May 13, 2019
21,363
Sweden
Why are there so many autistic children around today? I’m sure this wasn’t the case when I was a kid, and I genuinely don’t think it was only a case of it not being diagnosed.

My son is fairly mildly autistic (I think, no confirmed diagnoses yet) but I know numerous people with autistic kids, and I’m sure this wasn’t the case 20 years ago.

First off I dont think anyone knows if there's an actual increase in autism. It might be that lifestyles of the past made autistic people appear less autistic just like modern lifestyle could possibly make non-autistic people appear more autistic. And if there is an increase, it is very difficult to trace down the source: each year there's new chemicals added to the cocktail we consume whether we want it or not, new habits that might impact our brains, it could also be a case of social darwinism taking a new turn: 50 years you would reap the rewards of being in one way, 30 years later you would often be rewarded from being in another way with another set of skills. Its probably difficult if not impossible to find a cause if there is one.
 


Harry Wilson's tackle

Harry Wilson's Tackle
Oct 8, 2003
40,665
Faversham
My sister calls me socially awkward, I hate big social get-togethers. I hated school, all that being popular nonsense. I liked to keep my social group at any time small, no bigger then 5. My Dad's very similar. I remember my 20th birthday, I'd recently moved out and the guys I lived with decided to throw a party, there was around 30 people there, in a tiny flat. I hated it, some on here call me an attention seeker, they couldn't be more wrong. My mum and sister are the complete opposite.

It's only recently after spotting the signs in my son, that I said to my mum I think I'm on the spectrum. Unsurprisingly, she disagreed. Probably because she doesn't want to think she missed something.

I watched a programme about Paddy McGuinnes and his 3 children the other day, and was unaware that you can do a kind of test online that rates the possibility if you're on the spectrum. Most people score under 16, but anything about 25 I think suggests you're on the spectrum. I scored 30. I'm not sure how accurate these things are, but apparently it was designed by some Cambridge professor that has studied autism for over 35 years.

First, yes, the parents don't like to imagine the kid has an issue. My mum though I was 'fierce' but would never have acknowledged a problem. My dad was the same as me, but he had a 1930s-50s upbringing to cement his certainty and attitudes. So...

Wow. How very similar to my own experience. I scored way up there too, on several of the online tests. They are all very informative, if you be truthful. I like to put a spin on how sociable I am, but in truth I was lying to myself. I'm the one who everyone at a dinner party is studiously ignoring after a torrid 5 minute chat of ludicrous intensity, driven by my genuine efforts to be sociable :lolol: I haven't sought any 'support' yet (it's tricky....isn't it?). Mrs T got me to look into it after I was driving her mad during lockdown (over 'things put in front of other things' and related).

(Incidentally, and I have posted on this previously, I have been on several 'disciplinaries' at work for overly robust responses to (what I regards as) willfull dickwittery; I refuse to be disregarded just because I'm a bit peculiar, so I fight. It's rather fun, albeit it can result in my inappropriately crushing an unsuspecting innocent who does something carelessly that I regard as an egregious provocation??? Yes all in my mind I expect).

I taught a student last year who is on the spectrum and who rightly sees it as a gift. Lateral thinking, insight, and the occasional and unexpected harmony with a minority of people with whom one clicks. Sometimes with extraordinary consequences. Happy to chat via PM anytime. We have nothing to apologise for. :thumbsup:
 

Harry Wilson's tackle

Harry Wilson's Tackle
Oct 8, 2003
40,665
Faversham
First off I dont think anyone knows if there's an actual increase in autism. It might be that lifestyles of the past made autistic people appear less autistic just like modern lifestyle could possibly make non-autistic people appear more autistic. And if there is an increase, it is very difficult to trace down the source: each year there's new chemicals added to the cocktail we consume whether we want it or not, new habits that might impact our brains, it could also be a case of social darwinism taking a new turn: 50 years you would reap the rewards of being in one way, 30 years later you would often be rewarded from being in another way with another set of skills. Its probably difficult if not impossible to find a cause if there is one.

If my family is anything to go by it is deffo genetic. Both my brothers....my dad, and from what little I know of him, my grand dad. All Most Peculiar. I had my little brother (age 59) on the phone the other day telling me that he runs his car almost empty 'to save money' (what?) and during the recent fuel crisis found himelf queuing at 4.30 in the morning (what? ???) to put £10 of petrol on his tank so he could get to work. His house is paid for and he has >£100K in the bank (what? ??? ??? ???). He was close to tears on the phone :eek:. He has written many letters recently to his MP.

Luckily (???) my son is not affected.
 

Fat Boy Fat

Members
Aug 21, 2020
1,077
My sister calls me socially awkward, I hate big social get-togethers. I hated school, all that being popular nonsense. I liked to keep my social group at any time small, no bigger then 5. My Dad's very similar. I remember my 20th birthday, I'd recently moved out and the guys I lived with decided to throw a party, there was around 30 people there, in a tiny flat. I hated it, some on here call me an attention seeker, they couldn't be more wrong. My mum and sister are the complete opposite.

It's only recently after spotting the signs in my son, that I said to my mum I think I'm on the spectrum. Unsurprisingly, she disagreed. Probably because she doesn't want to think she missed something.

I watched a programme about Paddy McGuinnes and his 3 children the other day, and was unaware that you can do a kind of test online that rates the possibility if you're on the spectrum. Most people score under 16, but anything about 25 I think suggests you're on the spectrum. I scored 30. I'm not sure how accurate these things are, but apparently it was designed by some Cambridge professor that has studied autism for over 35 years.

Cousin of Borat, Simon Baron-Cohen...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Baron-Cohen
 

Brighton Lines

The Manifestation of Moribund
Apr 5, 2014
19,813
And the related condition, Aspergers goes undiagnosed. I wasn't identified as being 'on the spectrum' till I was 62 years old. When I was 7 my parents were told I may need to be put in the 'backward' class (I was bored, so I mucked about). Yet I went on to Grammar school, BSc, PhD, more than 100 peer reviewed research papers, etc etc. I can't read people very well, especially on an internet forum, but my imperative to fight injustice (against me, and against anyone, everyone and anything) keeps me . . . engaged. Otherwise I'd retreat into my own space.

A perhaps surprising number of NSC posters are on the spectrum. Testing out ideas in the relative anonymity and safe space of a curated forum? Perhaps.

Apologies if I've ever duffed you up in any way you consider unreasonable.

Resonates.

My Children;'s Home report described me as 'backward'-a tag that lingered. The term makes me spit blood, as does 'retard'- only it was adults in positions of responsibility that used it about me. That's what autistic kids were known as for those who don't think there were so many around. Things are so much better now.

But the phrase 'backward' still haunts me and has a life long affect on my personal confidence, unless I'm behind a screen with a keyboard writing blogs and stories. I cover the 'backward' thing in the early years piece I wrote. You might identify with the later paragraphs. My story is similar to yours in that respect.

https://queensparkchronicles.wordpr...table-child-my-journey-to-adoption-1969-1973/
 
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Greg Bobkin

Members
May 22, 2012
10,774
We do. It's called the Inclusion Room. I think [MENTION=5392]Reinelt12[/MENTION] might be interested.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-england-sussex-48099440

BBC feature

Yes, and ironically our season tickets are right in front of it in the family stand! (We are right at the back) It's a great idea, and have seen many kids/adults use it during games.

Home games aren't an issue (we are too quiet in the family stand!), but it is definitely something to think about in the future should I need to, so thank you.

Yep. Some words about it (pp35/36) – and other similar initiatives – from yet another NSC DULLARD here, in case anyone's interested: http://journal-download.co.uk/digitalmagazines/STA/STA01MAR2020/page_31.html

So glad you were looked after in the end, [MENTION=5392]Reinelt12[/MENTION] :thumbsup:
 

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