Shopping at via this link helps to support NSC

[Help] Gardeners Question Time.

Welcome to North Stand Chat - the biggest and best Brighton & Hove Albion fan site.

Go on - join - you know you want to! (Pssst: you'll get fewer ads too!)



WATFORD zero

Members
Jul 10, 2003
21,994
On the 2nd August, it was 40 years ago that I started....and i'm still there loving every minute of it!!!

Coffee soon Jack?

43 years ago I started on Hove Parks and Gardens, Seafront bowling greens, Adelaide Crescent and Finally St Anne's Well. Couldn't cut it though, only lasted 4 years :wink:
 

Coldeanseagull

Opinionated
Mar 13, 2013
5,949
Coldean
Nine weeks ago, I packed up working...cos I didn't want to do it any more. That's after doing various stuff for over forty five years.
I've never worked so hard these last nine weeks!
What's that got to do with a gardening thread you ask? Nothing really, I just wanted to tell people I'm sleeping in and doing what I want to....which is catch up on so, so many jobs. Actually, yes garden related because all the jobs involve my garden.
I've discover that after years of crastinating, I could've gone pro
 
Feb 23, 2009
7,476
North of Brighton
End of the month it's 50 years since I started work. Retired from the same company 4 years ago.

Anyhoo, here's the thing. I live on a privately maintained estate, so we manage the grounds ourselves. We have a green lung strip of meadow skirting the housing running from woodland to trees by the school. We do not cut the Meadow during summer, so it is long dry grass at the moment, good for the environment and the bugs etc. On the other hand, is it a fire risk during a heatwave? The dilemma is, do we cut it 6 weeks early and reduce the fire risk or take our chances and protect the environment.
 


Weststander

Members
Aug 25, 2011
53,811
Withdean area
End of the month it's 50 years since I started work. Retired from the same company 4 years ago.

Anyhoo, here's the thing. I live on a privately maintained estate, so we manage the grounds ourselves. We have a green lung strip of meadow skirting the housing running from woodland to trees by the school. We do not cut the Meadow during summer, so it is long dry grass at the moment, good for the environment and the bugs etc. On the other hand, is it a fire risk during a heatwave? The dilemma is, do we cut it 6 weeks early and reduce the fire risk or take our chances and protect the environment.

Drought or no drought, the advice is often to initially cut meadows by the first half of August.
 

Jack Straw

I look nothing like him!
Jul 7, 2003
6,257
Brighton. NOT KEMPTOWN!
End of the month it's 50 years since I started work. Retired from the same company 4 years ago.

Anyhoo, here's the thing. I live on a privately maintained estate, so we manage the grounds ourselves. We have a green lung strip of meadow skirting the housing running from woodland to trees by the school. We do not cut the Meadow during summer, so it is long dry grass at the moment, good for the environment and the bugs etc. On the other hand, is it a fire risk during a heatwave? The dilemma is, do we cut it 6 weeks early and reduce the fire risk or take our chances and protect the environment.

If all the wild flowers have set and shed their seeds, cut it down to nothing and clear away the cuttings. Then keep it mown until the winter, and let it loose again next year. Monty Don did exactly this in his wild flower area on last week's Gardeners' World.
It could be a fire hazard, so this would help to eliminate the risk.
 

Stat Brother

Members
Jul 11, 2003
69,408
West west west Sussex
If all the wild flowers have set and shed their seeds, cut it down to nothing and clear away the cuttings. Then keep it mown until the winter, and let it loose again next year. Monty Don did exactly this in his wild flower area on last week's Gardeners' World.
It could be a fire hazard, so this would help to eliminate the risk.

Only cos I told him too.
 

The Antikythera Mechanism

The oldest known computer
00463E9D-0602-48AD-B4E3-76FFFAC4B188.jpeg

Any tips on how to trim a climbing hydrangea? My house is resembling a Hobbit hole.
 

Jack Straw

I look nothing like him!
Jul 7, 2003
6,257
Brighton. NOT KEMPTOWN!
View attachment 150803

Any tips on how to trim a climbing hydrangea? My house is resembling a Hobbit hole.

That's wonderful! Looks like you've got a Virginia Creeper too. It looks like Parthenocissus tricuspidata, which is a self-clinger.
I would hang on until the leaves have fallen off of the Virginia Creeper so you benefit from the wonderful autumn colour and you can then see where the branches are.
If you can get a cherry-picker up to the house, I would hire one of those, and completely remove the VC and leave the Hydrangea.
If you like the VC, perhaps cut all growth above the guttering and around the windows, but you would need to do that every year or two. Just hope it hasn't clung on too enthusiastically!
As for the Hydrangea, I would cut it level with the underneath of the upstairs windows. It's nowhere as vigorous as the VC, so shouldn't give you any frequent problems.
 


Paying the bills

Latest Discussions

Paying the bills

Paying the bills

Paying the bills

Top