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[News] Key workers (?) and their rate of pay.

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Herr Tubthumper

Members
Jul 11, 2003
54,729
The Fatherland
Really? How come your companies with over 20,000 & 25,000 get away with not having to have one, yet my local athletics club (which I am still involved with behind the scenes) with only over 400 members max, HAS to have at least one person dedicated to such a role by law?

I can’t say I know much about the law on this subject but I have spent most of my working life working for, and liaising with, large companies and they all have roles, boards, councils etc relating to diversity. Maybe it’s my sector? But I would expect this in a large company, more as artefact of a large company as opposed to anything else; if you have 20000 plus employees you need a full time team just to handle the staff stationary so you’d certainly need dedicated resource to look after specific elements of their well-being.
 


schmunk

"Members"
Jan 19, 2018
7,469
Mid mid mid Sussex
Really? How come your companies with over 20,000 & 25,000 get away with not having to have one, yet my local athletics club (which I am still involved with behind the scenes) with only over 400 members max, HAS to have at least one person dedicated to such a role by law?

I work for a global firm with only about 5,000 staff worldwide.

We have a People and Culture board chaired by our CEO, Global Diversity and Inclusion Networks covering 6 key areas and 4 full time D&I Managers. We win awards for it and get lots of good press and client feedback.

It's a really valued part of our business.
 

dazzer6666

Members
Mar 27, 2013
44,713
Burgess Hill
Just curious. My experience is quite different. My last client which has 100000 global employees has 4 separate councils, each for a different diversity. These are each chaired by a member of the executive board. I’m not as familiar with my current client (75000) but a quick Google shows there’s a Head of Inclusion and Diversity. What I can say is both embed inclusion and diversity in their values, and commit significant resource i.e. it seems to be more than “an HR policy.” Both are hugely successful private companies.....if it’s needed and valuable for them, I’d say the same for the NHS?

It was similar in my last 2 firms (covering 17 years and with 120k and 300k staff respectively), but the councils were typically comprised of people who had ‘day jobs’ - there weren’t any dedicated D&I managers except (at times) perhaps one at Group level. Very little dedicated resource but a part and parcel of the role of any manager.

The policy was ‘owned’ by HR but it was a Board directive - and as you say embedded in values.
 
Another thing not mentioned here though is even the same job in private and public sectors has different pressure as well as pay. I've recently experienced NHS nurses practically running between patients when on shift and ready to collapse at times. Yet just last month I had to attend a private hospital with empty corridors , you could hear a pin drop it was that quiet. And nurses were standing up with a cup of tea chatting like they didn't have a care in the world
 
May 1, 2016
10,359
Oxton, Birkenhead
Really? How come your companies with over 20,000 & 25,000 get away with not having to have one, yet my local athletics club (which I am still involved with behind the scenes) with only over 400 members max, HAS to have at least one person dedicated to such a role by law?

When you say dedicated to such a role by law do you mean a full time dedicated role (doing nothing else) on £40-50000 per year like the NHS ? That’s quite a financial obligation for an athletics club. If so, perhaps it is because of state or lottery funding ?
 

Yoda

English & European
When you say dedicated to such a role by law do you mean a full time dedicated role (doing nothing else) on £40-50000 per year like the NHS ? That’s quite a financial obligation for an athletics club. If so, perhaps it is because of state or lottery funding ?

Doesn't have to be full time or their main role at our level, but someone has to provide/cover this with their coaching/training/whatever they do. I'm not even sure they've even had anyone require their services for it yet. :lol:
 

Audax

Boing boing boing...
Aug 3, 2015
2,294
Uckfield
Apologies, I'm grunching but those 2 jobs do not sound similar in terms of title to me.

Also, it is not necessarily about take home pay there are other factors such as pension contribution, private healthcare etc. that combine to make a total benefits package.

The job titles are different. The responsibilities and skills are broadly similar. Try not to fall into the trap of judging what level a job is at based on the title: a common trick to keep salary costs down is to "undersell" a job role by using a title that makes it sound more junior than it is in reality.

Also, as I've previously mentioned: within the NHS the pay structure (and thus job titles) are typically aligned to management. You most likely won't get a "Project Manager" job title if you don't have line management responsibilities.

For my Mrs to earn a similar salary to me in the NHS, she'd need to reach Band 8b - she'd need to be a "Head of ..." something, with wide ranging responsibility for an entire department. Me? I don't line manage anyone. I have responsibility for directing the work of a single agile team of software engineers. But even then, the technical side of it is handled by my Tech lead - my role is purely about prioritising what features to build when, coordinating with other teams in the company, and the like.

Re: the overall package: private sector, it depends on the company. In my case, my benefits package (beyond salary) makes the NHS package look pretty poor.
 


dazzer6666

Members
Mar 27, 2013
44,713
Burgess Hill
Doesn't have to be full time or their main role at our level, but someone has to provide/cover this with their coaching/training/whatever they do. I'm not even sure they've even had anyone require their services for it yet. :lol:

Probably an EA requirement to enable them to have be Clubmark accredited..................we had to have a 'press officer' for the same reason.
 

rippleman

Members
Oct 18, 2011
4,155
Yes, good point.

The problem the public sector has is marrying supply and demand with the knowledge that the money for it comes from taxing other workers.

With the NHS, my advice would be to pay the doctors, nurses, porters etc more by using the money saved by cutting non-jobs such as these...

View attachment 134708

You are absolutely correct. A matron's salary (ie for the most senior, highly trained nurse in a hospital) is around £45K.

Unbelievable and staggeringly ridiculous that similar or higher salaries are being offered for "there, thereing", shuffling paper and ticking boxes.

Get rid of these ridiculous, pointless jobs that don't add any direct benefit to the NHS whatsoever and

PAY THE NURSES A DECENT WEDGE
 

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