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[Drinking] Alcoholic/like a beer or two too much?

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Jun 17, 2011
859
Eastbourne
Bit of a sore one, but has anyone ever gone from complete lush head, done a medicated Detox and come out of the other side? Ideally my aim is to give up booze completely, so any tips would be welcome👍I am on day three? Cheers.
 


Bit of a sore one, but has anyone ever gone from complete lush head, done a medicated Detox and come out of the other side? Ideally my aim is to give up booze completely, so any tips would be welcome��I am on day three? Cheers.

No, but good luck in wishing to change your direction in life for the better. Stay positive and in time it will get easier to deal with.
 

Laridae

Members
Apr 28, 2011
364
West of Sussex
Well done for completing 3 days - I posted this previously on another thread but..

..I finally managed to knock the drinking on the head 18 months or so ago. The key for me was to 'understand' the science behind alcohol. So I decided to sign up for a free 30 day online experiment - check it out here: https://www.alcoholexperiment.com

Now I finally understand alcohol (I won't spoil the surprises!) I am totally switched off to the idea of drinking. Who knows if I'll use alcohol again but right now I just don't want to, I've literally no desire whatsoever which, for a moderate binge drinker since my teens and in my late 30s, is quite a turnaround!

If you can spare 10-20 mins a day for 30 days to watch a course of daily videos, read a supporting article and keep an online journal then I'd thoroughly recommend the Alcohol Experiment even if you're just a looking to cut down (which was my initial goal) or go fully alcohol free... for me it's been brilliant. Quite possibly a life-changer!

PM me if you want more info (without coming across all 'preachy'!)

https://www.alcoholexperiment.com

PS, don't know how true this is but in-take plenty of Protein, Magnesium and Pri-biotics in the first couple of weeks - apparently your body will cry out for these whilst you're coming off the booze so it'll help with initial cravings.
 


maffew

Members
Dec 10, 2003
8,768
Worcester England
"Come out the other side" Yeah it can be done, believe me. proud to say I guess I am 18 months with zero units new career, house, good health, offered work also in support services and with the homeless so I look forward to volunteering at some point, when I have the time (I keep very very busy with stuff).
3 days in :thumbsup:

be sure to mention this
Suffer PTSD, Depression, Anxiety and a dose of OCD in there for good measure. I am officially pickled��
to whoever has prescribed your detox if you haven't . The 2 are horribly intertwined, anxiety for me was terrifying

For me, meditation, yoga, walking,music, sound therapy, chess all help(ed) with my anxiety and over active brain. Food, you'll get back into food! Keep busy. Make "to do" lists. Be patient.
Be prepared to miss out on things. If the football isnt the same without a few beers, consider not going. It's not the same for me if I'm honest. Be "selfish" if you need to, put your wellness first (if it doesn't impact too much on others) you dont have to go on work do's, or attend weddings for example. Stay focused And Patient.

Consider AA (didn't suit me) or other meetup groups. Different horses, different courses. Make plans for payday which don't involve going for a big night out. It isnt "failing" if you take a drink (depending on who you ask)


I have loads of tips and if you want to chat ever or feel shite feel free to PM me.
 
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When I worked in Pharma (we had an addiction “portfolio”) we looked into a therapeutic medicine for alcohol addiction. We found one. Very high (90% efficacy) and good compliance.

The problem was that the drug was a generic. No patent protection meant that our study and then a change of indication would have cost us at least £1m at which point anyone else who held a licence for it could piggyback on our indication. No money in it means no point.
 

Herr Tubthumper

Members
Jul 11, 2003
54,793
The Fatherland
When I worked in Pharma (we had an addiction “portfolio”) we looked into a therapeutic medicine for alcohol addiction. We found one. Very high (90% efficacy) and good compliance.

The problem was that the drug was a generic. No patent protection meant that our study and then a change of indication would have cost us at least £1m at which point anyone else who held a licence for it could piggyback on our indication. No money in it means no point.

This is not strictly true. This is the sort of thing, for example, health insurance companies, might fund. They might see money to be saved especially if it’s a generic. There are also plenty of other bodies, organisations and charities etc who might fund this.
 
This is not strictly true. This is the sort of thing, for example, health insurance companies, might fund. They might see money to be saved especially if it’s a generic. There are also plenty of other bodies, organisations and charities etc who might fund this.

I was the marketing lead for this. We did the entire piece. Looked into alternate funding routes and discussed with a lot of NHS addiction service leads, the MHRA and NHS England. There was no getting around the fact that the generic pharma houses would have jumped on board within 5 minutes.

We looked at altering the formulation to make it a different presentation but that wasn’t enough of a differentiator to change prescribers to a brand.

The ethical thing to do would have been for the Government to fund the development cycle and alert prescribers to the efficacy. That way the addicts would receive the treatment they need. The issue here is that there is a very healthy market in private hands (priory etc) that would lose millions if addiction to alcohol was managed chemically...their lobby would certainly object. Charities too really have no interest in a “cure”;for addiction. They need a reason to exist after all.

It’s sad. But it’s certainly true.

Also. There isn’t a mechanism in Government to influence this.
 

lost in london

Members
Dec 10, 2003
1,727
London
The issue here is that there is a very healthy market in private hands (priory etc) that would lose millions if addiction to alcohol was managed chemically...their lobby would certainly object. Charities too really have no interest in a “cure”;for addiction. They need a reason to exist after all.

It’s sad. But it’s certainly true.
.

Are you saying that charities had no interest in pursuing an off the shelf (I presume that's what you mean by 'generic'?) addiction remedy because it would put them out of business?
 


Are you saying that charities had no interest in pursuing an off the shelf (I presume that's what you mean by 'generic'?) addiction remedy because it would put them out of business?

It’s not off the shelf. It’s a generic prescription only medicine.

Charities don’t own or fund pharmaceutical licence variations.
It’s down to a Pharma company to identify, develop, conduct a large scale clinical trial, submit an application to vary an existing licence, manufacture, change prescribing information, conduct stability testing, put in place a post launch surveillance strategy, package, get marketing authorisation, develop distribution channels, hire sales reps, take out appropriate insurance against claimants who are potentially harmed by a change of indication. Launch.

All of this can cost millions.

At which point a cheap generic house claims a “me too” licence and hoovers up the profit.
 

Johnny RoastBeef

Wanna balloon?
Jan 11, 2016
2,728
I was the marketing lead for this. We did the entire piece. Looked into alternate funding routes and discussed with a lot of NHS addiction service leads, the MHRA and NHS England. There was no getting around the fact that the generic pharma houses would have jumped on board within 5 minutes.

We looked at altering the formulation to make it a different presentation but that wasn’t enough of a differentiator to change prescribers to a brand.

The ethical thing to do would have been for the Government to fund the development cycle and alert prescribers to the efficacy. That way the addicts would receive the treatment they need. The issue here is that there is a very healthy market in private hands (priory etc) that would lose millions if addiction to alcohol was managed chemically...their lobby would certainly object. Charities too really have no interest in a “cure”;for addiction. They need a reason to exist after all.

It’s sad. But it’s certainly true.

Also. There isn’t a mechanism in Government to influence this.

Out of interest, how did the drug work, as the FDA has three such drugs approved for alcohol disorder?

One makes you sick if you drink even a small amount. One allows you to get drunk, but suppresses the pleasure associated. The last one eases withdrawal symptoms.

If yours is significantly different and with such high efficacy, I'm sure crowd funding would easily cover the costs of licencing.
 
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golddene

Members
Jul 28, 2012
1,859
Bit of a sore one, but has anyone ever gone from complete lush head, done a medicated Detox and come out of the other side? Ideally my aim is to give up booze completely, so any tips would be welcome��I am on day three? Cheers.

Good on you mate, I've known a few " lush heads" who never even realised they were? Sad to say some are no longer here! Just take one day at a time buddy, the first hardest thing is seeing you may have a problem. Good luck
 
Out of interest, how did the drug work, as the FDA has three such drugs approved for alcohol disorder.

One makes you sick if you drink even a small amount. One allows you to get drunk, but suppresses the pleasure associated. The last one eases withdrawal symptoms.

If yours is significantly different and with such high efficacy, I'm sure crowd funding would easily cover the costs of licencing.

It works in a totally unexpected way. It is prescribed “off licence” by some Doctors.

I don’t know how crowdfunding could achieve this. There isn’t actually anything like a full scale clinical study to prove efficacy.

There are small studies, like ours that have shown consistently high success rates. They’ve now been done in the US, UK, France and Germany..all with the same outcome.

You need thousands of patients to gain a full clinical trial profile. It takes years and costs millions...and at the end...the licence could still not be approved for some technical reason or other.

In effect it’s a massive risk. To fund this for a generic prescription only medicine, that is widely available for another indication already...and costs peanuts...no one is going to do it.
 
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