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[News] St. Andrew's Day one and all

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Bry Nylon

Test your smoke alarm
Jul 21, 2003
19,139
Playing snooker
After a long and emotional St Andrew's Day, [MENTION=205]Tom Hark, Preston Park[/MENTION] makes a mental note not to fall asleep against freshly-painted railings on the seafront again.

thumb_4A6869E8-7D98-445D-9039-89E843464856.jpg
 
Feb 23, 2009
20,173
Brighton factually.....
Great patriotic movie with a lot of scenes filmed in Ireland and an Australian in the lead role

Ain't that the truth....
Robert the Bruce was actually nicknamed Braveheart not william Wallace..
Robert The Bruce Did Not Betray William
Isabella Was 13 And She Did Not Fall In Love With William Wallace
At The Time Of William Wallace, Kilts Were Not A Thing
King Edward II Was Not A Gay Stereotype
The Highlanders Would Not Have Worn Blue Faces Or Hair Adornments at the time
William's Father Did Not Die During His Childhood
The Scots Never Sacked York
The Irish And The Scottish Did Not Join Forces At Falkirk

But don't let that get in the way of a good story about a heathen lowland noble clans man who's surname means Welshman, save a race a people fighting for a land inhabited and re named by the Irish. (The Scoti)

Hate the film for it's blatantly anti English stance.
 

NooBHA

Members
Jan 13, 2015
8,438
I agree that much of the Film was a load of old ''pish'' - but to suggest that Edward 2nd might not be gay - I am not sure what a ''Gay Stereotype '' is but Edward 2nd was without doubt 100% Gay. The Derek Jarman film of the 1990s was extensively researched before the film was made.

Once installed as king, following the death of his father, Edward II summons his friend and lover, Piers Gaveston, back to England from exile abroad, and showers him with gifts, titles and abiding love. Their relationship is fiery and passionate, but it is the focus of gossip and derision throughout the kingdom. Upon his return, Gaveston takes revenge on the Bishop of Winchester, who had been responsible for his banishment from England during the previous reign, by personally torturing him. Kent, Edward's brother, is the first to protest about Gaveston's return. Many others feel the same way, including the Bishop of Winchester and Lord Mortimer, who is in charge of the kingdom's military forces. Nevertheless, Edward defends his lover from his mounting enemies.

A pleasure-seeker, Edward is quite distracted from affairs of state, much to the distress and anger of the court (sombre men and women in business suits). Queen Isabella, Edward's French wife, vainly tries everything to win him back from his lover, but she is mercilessly rejected by her husband. Love-starved, Isabella turns to Gaveston, who inflames Isabella's desire by whispering obscenities in her ear, and then mocks her responsiveness.

The handsome, hedonistic and opportunistic Gaveston repels everyone except the King. His enemies join forces and threaten Edward with dethronement and exile; Edward is forced to comply with their wishes and sends Gaveston away. The lovers' separation is serenaded by Annie Lennox’s rendition of Cole Porter's "Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye".

The queen hopes that once Gaveston is away she could reconcile with her husband, but he rejects her once again. In a last effort to regain her husband's affection, she allows Gaveston to return. The king and his lover resume their relationship, but their enemies are ready to strike back.

Isabella and Mortimer, who has become her lover, plan to rule the realm through Edward and Isabella's young son, the future Edward III. When Kent tries to save his brother, he is murdered by Isabella. The nobles are soon plotting to get rid not only of Gaveston but also the king. Mortimer, their leader, is a military man and practising sadomasochist who takes a grim pleasure in personally torturing Gaveston and the lovers' friend Spencer, who he addresses as "girl boy." Their torture takes place while there is a clash between the police and members of the British gay rights organisation Outrage.

After Gaveston and Spencer's assassinations, Edward, who has been thrown in a dungeon, is executed by impalement on a red-hot poker. This hideous fate is presented as a nightmare from which the imprisoned king awakens. The executioner, when he does arrive, tosses away his lethal weapon and kisses the man he was sent to kill.

Back in the castle, Mortimer and Isabella enjoy their triumph just briefly. The king's young son, Edward III, who all along has been neglected by both parents and who has witnessed their quarrels, has donned his mother's earrings and lipstick and, while listening to classical music on his Walkman, walks atop a cage that imprisons his mother and Mortimer.
 


Feb 23, 2009
20,173
Brighton factually.....
I agree that much of the Film was a load of old ''pish'' - but to suggest that Edward 2nd might not be gay - I am not sure what a ''Gay Stereotype '' is but Edward 2nd was without doubt 100% Gay.][/B]

Maybe I phased that wrong, he was shall we say a double adaptor ? I think you will find it was common place amongst the aristocracy and the military back then, well it always has been even the Vikings, Saxons, Romans, had to keep warm on those long campaigns of war....

The Derek Jarman film of the 1990s was extensively researched before the film was made.

Back in the castle, Mortimer and Isabella enjoy their triumph just briefly. The king's young son, Edward III, who all along has been neglected by both parents and who has witnessed their quarrels, has donned his mother's earrings and lipstick and, while listening to classical music on his Walkman.

Really, are you sure :lolol:
 

NooBHA

Members
Jan 13, 2015
8,438
Maybe I phased that wrong, he was shall we say a double adaptor ? I think you will find it was common place amongst the aristocracy and the military back then, well it always has been even the Vikings, Saxons, Romans, had to keep warm on those long campaigns of war....



Really, are you sure :lolol:



I think that was the '' film makers '' contemporary modern day analogy - I extracted it from Wikipedia - I haven't actually seen the Edward II film - But when it was being funded / made ; I recall my Firm where I worked at the time helped put together Art's Council Grant Applications to help fund the making of the film


I did actually laugh at your phrase ''double adaptor'' - I couldn't get my Politically correct head on quick enough to stop myself
 

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