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[Albion] If the Premier League is able to continue...

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Where should the remainder of Premier League games be played?

  • Home grounds, as originally scheduled

    Votes: 133 75.6%
  • Home grounds (I don't think really believe this, but I'm #TeamBarbs)

    Votes: 29 16.5%
  • Neutral venues

    Votes: 14 8.0%

  • Total voters
    176

Easy 10

Brain dead MUG SHEEP
Jul 5, 2003
60,086
Location Location
Could we veto that the Amex be used as a neutral ground, if it comes to it? Or would the club be fined if they said it would not be available ?

We are at the mercy of the vote. If 14 of the 20 clubs vote in favour of neutral grounds, then neutral grounds it is. We (as a member club) have no veto on this, and if the EPL decide the Amex is one of the venues, I don't see how we can oppose it if we've lost out in that vote. What would be the point ?

We'd just have to get on with it.
 


Easy 10

Brain dead MUG SHEEP
Jul 5, 2003
60,086
Location Location
Paul Barber made it clear on Monday, that would be financial disaster for the football sector, 100,000 jobs on the line, clubs very existence on the line. The BBC calculate the loss to the PL alone will be £1.15b, the EFL this week costed it at £200m for their 72 clubs.

Why would football supporters want to bust clubs and create unemployment?

Long term this might be the case - but I refuse to believe that this armageddon would come about in the event of THIS season not being finished. Sky/BT won't want to kill the golden goose.

If clubs and broadcasters come together to formulate a plan then I'm sure they can find a way through the current choppy waters. Its not all about the next 9-10 games. Its about the next 4-5 years.
 

LamieRobertson

Not awoke
Feb 3, 2008
43,157
SHOREHAM BY SEA
Paul Barber made it clear on Monday, that would be financial disaster for the football sector, 100,000 jobs on the line, clubs very existence on the line. The BBC calculate the loss to the PL alone will be £1.15b, the EFL this week costed it at £200m for their 72 clubs.

Why would football supporters want to bust clubs and create unemployment?

I agree and don’t think it should be voided full stop ..but also it’s inevitable that some sort of restructuring has to take place of footballs finances down through the leagues and it’s relationship with tv companies etc
 
Feb 23, 2009
20,202
Brighton factually.....
Paul Barber made it clear on Monday, that would be financial disaster for the football sector, 100,000 jobs on the line, clubs very existence on the line. The BBC calculate the loss to the PL alone will be £1.15b, the EFL this week costed it at £200m for their 72 clubs.

Why would football supporters want to bust clubs and create unemployment?

We will see, don’t blame me I never ate undercooked bat.
 

Weststander

Members
Aug 25, 2011
54,206
Withdean area
I agree and don’t think it should be voided full stop ..but also it’s inevitable that some sort of restructuring has to take place of footballs finances down through the leagues and it’s relationship with tv companies etc

Definitely.

Players wages, other than for future Grealish’s and Madisson’s at ManU and ManC, imho have peaked, future contracts will be less lucrative.

The vast majority of clubs including the Albion have slept walked into a crazy situation, where player wages are creating vast annual losses. The Albion’s club income is £143m, but costs (excluding player trading) are £171m with payroll at £102m within that. Shirley it’s madness that every time a new player joins the Albion on record pay, half a dozen other players get a pay rise to match that. [That’s not me guessing. Several ITK or analytical posters often talk about that arrangement each summer transfer window].

Clubs have left themselves in a position now where income has collapsed, but their players are completely untouched unless they volunteer a private donation to NHS charities.

Unsustainable, high risk.
 

DFL JCL

Members
Jan 8, 2016
760
I think neutral grounds fundamentally affects the fairness of the competition. It seems a very strange proposal to me. Let's see what the government says next. Any proposal for the restart of football can only be appraised properly when taken against the back drop of the current government guidance.

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
 

beorhthelm

A. Virgo, Football Genius
Jul 21, 2003
33,705
Paul Barber made it clear on Monday, that would be financial disaster for the football sector, 100,000 jobs on the line, clubs very existence on the line. The BBC calculate the loss to the PL alone will be £1.15b, the EFL this week costed it at £200m for their 72 clubs.

whats this loss based on? if its TV money, the broadcasters have a choice of bankrupting the sport and killing it for themselves in the process, or not. if its from match days, there's no revenue from playing behind closed doors. i dont believe there will be that large an impact from voiding, with league and broadcaster coming to an arrangement to suit both.
 


Mo Gosfield

Members
Aug 11, 2010
5,909
Definitely.

Players wages, other than for future Grealish’s and Madisson’s at ManU and ManC, imho have peaked, future contracts will be less lucrative.

The vast majority of clubs including the Albion have slept walked into a crazy situation, where player wages are creating vast annual losses. The Albion’s club income is £143m, but costs (excluding player trading) are £171m with payroll at £102m within that. Shirley it’s madness that every time a new player joins the Albion on record pay, half a dozen other players get a pay rise to match that. [That’s not me guessing. Several ITK or analytical posters often talk about that arrangement each summer transfer window].

Clubs have left themselves in a position now where income has collapsed, but their players are completely untouched unless they volunteer a private donation to NHS charities.

Unsustainable, high risk.


Agreed.
Football will never have a better chance to step off the rollercoaster, take a deep breath, look at itself and realise that it has created its own monster. This situation will show whether football feels it has a duty of care to all of its industry or whether elitism/protectionism/greed ( with us since 1992 ) will roll on regardless. Although football, particularly in the UK, has existed in its own inflation/depression/recession proof micro bubble, we are facing a near unprecedented scenario here.The future of much of the industry is at stake. People say that football is resilient but it hasn't faced this before. The PL might be the shop window but the rest of the pyramid is essential to enable the game to flourish and develop. 92 league clubs plus a host of semi-pro outfits give countless youngsters the opportunity to enter the game at a lower level, progress and harbour dreams of playing at the highest levels. It gives officials experience and grounding to enable them to progress. It unites communities, generates business locally and is a focal point in many towns.It is historic, it is passionate and emotional. It plays a big part in many people's lives.
The football world stood back and effectively let a proud and historic club like Bury go out of business, when one PL player's monthly wage would probably have kept them afloat. Lower level clubs rely far more on entrance money, programme, merchandise and food sales and local sponsorship. Its their life blood. Not the pittance that trickles down from higher up. Now its time for PL football to realise that it can't keep going to the well and drinking vast amounts, without serious consequences. All through the economy, people are going to have to make sacrifices. Highly talented people will lose their jobs. Many,many businesses will close forever. Sectors of our economy will take months/years to recover and still won't get back to previous levels. Billions have been lost and will continue to be lost and PL players sit there with a protective blanket thrown round them.
Football thinks its vitally important. It isn't. In the scheme of things, they are just medium sized businesses. They aren't corporations or multi nationals. Compared to the NHS, Pharmaceutical giants, Supermarket chains, major drinks players, banks, financial institutions, oil and petro chemical firms and online tech giants, they are small fry. Its an industry that provides pleasure for many but so do cinema's, theatres, clubs, concerts, pubs and restaurants and they are all taking it on the chin, suffering hardship and some are facing ruin. When the real priorities in life are at the forefront..i.e healthcare, food and drink, football needs to accept its place in society. Its just another form of recreation and enjoyment.
The rush to return leaves me uneasy. Its almost as if football is saying that its a special case and has to return asap. It is no special than many other industries, less so than many who will have to wait a long time. The PL by its nature is self centred and elitist, so I do not expect any change in attitude to the structure below them. They haven't worried for nearly 30 years, why should they start now. I'm alright Jack.
 
Jul 24, 2007
9,573
Arundel
I do understand your point. but If we do restart it would not be till June 6th I believe at the earliest. Would you not expect daily Deaths from Covid to be negligible by then.
If say there were 10 daily deaths or perhaps 100 in previous week before they restart would you still consider it not a good idea to finish season with no spectators ?
Believe Germany are restarting in a couple of weeks.

Yes I would. What concerns me though is that we are seeing a flattening of the curve and some downward trend. Everything that moves towards normality now may encourage more people to travel and take risks. Trust me, I own my own business and I need us back out there, it's critical to me, but we cannot afford a second spike and I fear that's what our desire for sport may cause.
 

southstandandy

WEST STAND ANDY
Jul 9, 2003
4,939
I think neutral grounds fundamentally affects the fairness of the competition. It seems a very strange proposal to me. Let's see what the government says next. Any proposal for the restart of football can only be appraised properly when taken against the back drop of the current government guidance.

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk

Totally agree, although worryingly the Championship are apparently now looking at neutral venues too for their remaining games - it's going to be chaotic if this happens.

Let's just hope Boris gives some clear guidance with his statement on Sunday and if social distancing is relaxed then football can start to plan for it's return.
 

blue-shifted

Banned
Feb 20, 2004
7,645
a galaxy far far away
Totally agree, although worryingly the Championship are apparently now looking at neutral venues too for their remaining games - it's going to be chaotic if this happens.

Let's just hope Boris gives some clear guidance with his statement on Sunday and if social distancing is relaxed then football can start to plan for it's return.

Arguably it's more important that Championship clubs get the games back on. With no football at all, 3 Champ clubs will go under for every Premier League club
 

southstandandy

WEST STAND ANDY
Jul 9, 2003
4,939
Arguably it's more important that Championship clubs get the games back on. With no football at all, 3 Champ clubs will go under for every Premier League club

Agree - but having all four divisions potentially playing in neutral venues just seems to me like moving the problem around the country and I would have thought be a logistical headache to sort out.
 


Weststander

Members
Aug 25, 2011
54,206
Withdean area
whats this loss based on? if its TV money, the broadcasters have a choice of bankrupting the sport and killing it for themselves in the process, or not. if its from match days, there's no revenue from playing behind closed doors. i dont believe there will be that large an impact from voiding, with league and broadcaster coming to an arrangement to suit both.

No one’s saying the broadcasters are acting to kill the PL. They simply want this season to complete with relegations to get consideration for their last £0.75b paid in advance, and they’re backed by the clubs and government. Villa, Brighton and the other basement clubs gripe is the neutral grounds idea, Paul Barber eloquently explained the entire picture on Monday evening.
 

bobbysmith01

Members
Feb 6, 2015
736
Agreed.
Football will never have a better chance to step off the rollercoaster, take a deep breath, look at itself and realise that it has created its own monster. This situation will show whether football feels it has a duty of care to all of its industry or whether elitism/protectionism/greed ( with us since 1992 ) will roll on regardless. Although football, particularly in the UK, has existed in its own inflation/depression/recession proof micro bubble, we are facing a near unprecedented scenario here.The future of much of the industry is at stake. People say that football is resilient but it hasn't faced this before. The PL might be the shop window but the rest of the pyramid is essential to enable the game to flourish and develop. 92 league clubs plus a host of semi-pro outfits give countless youngsters the opportunity to enter the game at a lower level, progress and harbour dreams of playing at the highest levels. It gives officials experience and grounding to enable them to progress. It unites communities, generates business locally and is a focal point in many towns.It is historic, it is passionate and emotional. It plays a big part in many people's lives.
The football world stood back and effectively let a proud and historic club like Bury go out of business, when one PL player's monthly wage would probably have kept them afloat. Lower level clubs rely far more on entrance money, programme, merchandise and food sales and local sponsorship. Its their life blood. Not the pittance that trickles down from higher up. Now its time for PL football to realise that it can't keep going to the well and drinking vast amounts, without serious consequences. All through the economy, people are going to have to make sacrifices. Highly talented people will lose their jobs. Many,many businesses will close forever. Sectors of our economy will take months/years to recover and still won't get back to previous levels. Billions have been lost and will continue to be lost and PL players sit there with a protective blanket thrown round them.
Football thinks its vitally important. It isn't. In the scheme of things, they are just medium sized businesses. They aren't corporations or multi nationals. Compared to the NHS, Pharmaceutical giants, Supermarket chains, major drinks players, banks, financial institutions, oil and petro chemical firms and online tech giants, they are small fry. Its an industry that provides pleasure for many but so do cinema's, theatres, clubs, concerts, pubs and restaurants and they are all taking it on the chin, suffering hardship and some are facing ruin. When the real priorities in life are at the forefront..i.e healthcare, food and drink, football needs to accept its place in society. Its just another form of recreation and enjoyment.
The rush to return leaves me uneasy. Its almost as if football is saying that its a special case and has to return asap. It is no special than many other industries, less so than many who will have to wait a long time. The PL by its nature is self centred and elitist, so I do not expect any change in attitude to the structure below them. They haven't worried for nearly 30 years, why should they start now. I'm alright Jack.

Perfectly put, well said Sir.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

blue-shifted

Banned
Feb 20, 2004
7,645
a galaxy far far away
Agreed.
Football will never have a better chance to step off the rollercoaster, take a deep breath, look at itself and realise that it has created its own monster. This situation will show whether football feels it has a duty of care to all of its industry or whether elitism/protectionism/greed ( with us since 1992 ) will roll on regardless. Although football, particularly in the UK, has existed in its own inflation/depression/recession proof micro bubble, we are facing a near unprecedented scenario here.The future of much of the industry is at stake. People say that football is resilient but it hasn't faced this before. The PL might be the shop window but the rest of the pyramid is essential to enable the game to flourish and develop. 92 league clubs plus a host of semi-pro outfits give countless youngsters the opportunity to enter the game at a lower level, progress and harbour dreams of playing at the highest levels. It gives officials experience and grounding to enable them to progress. It unites communities, generates business locally and is a focal point in many towns.It is historic, it is passionate and emotional. It plays a big part in many people's lives.
The football world stood back and effectively let a proud and historic club like Bury go out of business, when one PL player's monthly wage would probably have kept them afloat. Lower level clubs rely far more on entrance money, programme, merchandise and food sales and local sponsorship. Its their life blood. Not the pittance that trickles down from higher up. Now its time for PL football to realise that it can't keep going to the well and drinking vast amounts, without serious consequences. All through the economy, people are going to have to make sacrifices. Highly talented people will lose their jobs. Many,many businesses will close forever. Sectors of our economy will take months/years to recover and still won't get back to previous levels. Billions have been lost and will continue to be lost and PL players sit there with a protective blanket thrown round them.
Football thinks its vitally important. It isn't. In the scheme of things, they are just medium sized businesses. They aren't corporations or multi nationals. Compared to the NHS, Pharmaceutical giants, Supermarket chains, major drinks players, banks, financial institutions, oil and petro chemical firms and online tech giants, they are small fry. Its an industry that provides pleasure for many but so do cinema's, theatres, clubs, concerts, pubs and restaurants and they are all taking it on the chin, suffering hardship and some are facing ruin. When the real priorities in life are at the forefront..i.e healthcare, food and drink, football needs to accept its place in society. Its just another form of recreation and enjoyment.
The rush to return leaves me uneasy. Its almost as if football is saying that its a special case and has to return asap. It is no special than many other industries, less so than many who will have to wait a long time. The PL by its nature is self centred and elitist, so I do not expect any change in attitude to the structure below them. They haven't worried for nearly 30 years, why should they start now. I'm alright Jack.

A bit more white space and I might have made it past the first 4 lines :)
 

nicko31

Members
Jan 7, 2010
15,393
Gods country fortnightly
Agreed.
Football will never have a better chance to step off the rollercoaster, take a deep breath, look at itself and realise that it has created its own monster. This situation will show whether football feels it has a duty of care to all of its industry or whether elitism/protectionism/greed ( with us since 1992 ) will roll on regardless. Although football, particularly in the UK, has existed in its own inflation/depression/recession proof micro bubble, we are facing a near unprecedented scenario here.The future of much of the industry is at stake. People say that football is resilient but it hasn't faced this before. The PL might be the shop window but the rest of the pyramid is essential to enable the game to flourish and develop. 92 league clubs plus a host of semi-pro outfits give countless youngsters the opportunity to enter the game at a lower level, progress and harbour dreams of playing at the highest levels. It gives officials experience and grounding to enable them to progress. It unites communities, generates business locally and is a focal point in many towns.It is historic, it is passionate and emotional. It plays a big part in many people's lives.
The football world stood back and effectively let a proud and historic club like Bury go out of business, when one PL player's monthly wage would probably have kept them afloat. Lower level clubs rely far more on entrance money, programme, merchandise and food sales and local sponsorship. Its their life blood. Not the pittance that trickles down from higher up. Now its time for PL football to realise that it can't keep going to the well and drinking vast amounts, without serious consequences. All through the economy, people are going to have to make sacrifices. Highly talented people will lose their jobs. Many,many businesses will close forever. Sectors of our economy will take months/years to recover and still won't get back to previous levels. Billions have been lost and will continue to be lost and PL players sit there with a protective blanket thrown round them.
Football thinks its vitally important. It isn't. In the scheme of things, they are just medium sized businesses. They aren't corporations or multi nationals. Compared to the NHS, Pharmaceutical giants, Supermarket chains, major drinks players, banks, financial institutions, oil and petro chemical firms and online tech giants, they are small fry. Its an industry that provides pleasure for many but so do cinema's, theatres, clubs, concerts, pubs and restaurants and they are all taking it on the chin, suffering hardship and some are facing ruin. When the real priorities in life are at the forefront..i.e healthcare, food and drink, football needs to accept its place in society. Its just another form of recreation and enjoyment.
The rush to return leaves me uneasy. Its almost as if football is saying that its a special case and has to return asap. It is no special than many other industries, less so than many who will have to wait a long time. The PL by its nature is self centred and elitist, so I do not expect any change in attitude to the structure below them. They haven't worried for nearly 30 years, why should they start now. I'm alright Jack.

Thank you, spot on...
 

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