Got something to say or just want fewer pesky ads? Join us... 😊

[News] D Day 80th Year Anniversary









Sid and the Sharknados

Well-known member
NSC Patron
Sep 4, 2022
4,883
Darlington
Would it be the same as asking an Anglo Saxon PhD student “Did you know Kenya and Ghana used to be part of the UK” …. using your expression?
No, because those countries weren't intrinsic parts of the UK in the way that Algeria was with France.

I'd say the closest equivalent would be Ireland formerly being in the UK, which I do think many people don't really understand even if they're vaguely aware of it. I've no reason to think it's not taught in school in the same way it was when I was a teenager, but I do doubt many people really take it in.

Similarly (and to bring this back to the topic at hand) I don't think there's any conspiracy or movement by the powers that be to lower the profile of D-Day or to brush the war under the carpet, but these things inevitably fade into the distance with time. I grew up living with my grandmother who remembered running through London to a shelter with her baby brother in her arms as bombs landed around her. My younger relatives don't have that and there's nothing really anybody can do about it.
 


Harry Wilson's tackle

Harry Wilson's Tackle
NSC Patron
Oct 8, 2003
53,166
Faversham


Weststander

Well-known member
NSC Patron
Aug 25, 2011
66,194
Withdean area
No, because those countries weren't intrinsic parts of the UK in the way that Algeria was with France.

I'd say the closest equivalent would be Ireland formerly being in the UK, which I do think many people don't really understand even if they're vaguely aware of it. I've no reason to think it's not taught in school in the same way it was when I was a teenager, but I do doubt many people really take it in.

Similarly (and to bring this back to the topic at hand) I don't think there's any conspiracy or movement by the powers that be to lower the profile of D-Day or to brush the war under the carpet, but these things inevitably fade into the distance with time. I grew up living with my grandmother who remembered running through London to a shelter with her baby brother in her arms as bombs landed around her. My younger relatives don't have that and there's nothing really anybody can do about it.

I wasn’t taught about WW1 or WW2 at school, I still have the books.

My kids in the 2010’s weren’t either. I helped them all the way through. As I said in an early post, only the rise of the Nazis.

I always put that down to there’s only so much of history that can be taught in a small part of the curriculum and school day.

Back to Algeria, France ultimately lost the war in 1962. Perhaps from that day in every respect it was swept under the carpet, a defeat and for some the shame. Extending to not telling gens of kids about the history. Modern Japan did this over Korea and China.
 




Couldn't Be Hyypia

We've come a long long way together
NSC Patron
Nov 12, 2006
16,059
Near Dorchester, Dorset
Beautifully observed here in Beaminster, Dorset. Small parade, including two or three veterans, from the church to the square. Then a brief history and the last post. Poignant
1000011535.jpg
.
 




Sid and the Sharknados

Well-known member
NSC Patron
Sep 4, 2022
4,883
Darlington
I wasn’t taught about WW1 or WW2 at school, I still have the books.

My kids in the 2010’s weren’t either. I helped them all the way through. As I said in an early post, only the rise of the Nazis.

I always put that down to there’s only so much of history that can be taught in a small part of the curriculum and school day.

Back to Algeria, France ultimately lost the war in 1962. Perhaps from that day in every respect it was swept under the carpet, a defeat and for some the shame. Extending to not telling gens of kids about the history. Modern Japan did this over Korea and China.
I don't think we ever directly learnt about any wars as such, unless you count The Troubles (which you probably should but again was more to do with the 500 years leading up to it than the actual Troubles themselves). And the trip to Flanders to visit the First World War cemeteries and memorials there.

One of the deputy heads / IT teachers was very into his history and I suspect was responsible for arranging a trip up to Newhaven Fort to listen to a survivor of the Holocaust talk about their experience, which I'm sad to admit I don't remember in anywhere near as much detail as I should do.
 




Nicks

Well-known member
My late Dad's best mate was one of Flemings Commando's based in Littlehampton and was over there way before D Day taking sand samples off all the beaches.( The Marine Pub was there local although it's been converted now )
They also went into Paris before the Liberation doing certain things.
 


Fignon's Ponytail

Well-known member
Jun 29, 2012
4,267
On the Beach
We did the History Walking Tour through Newhaven last night - a wonderful hour learning so much more than I already knew.

The (still there) slipway in the harbour that was specifically built for loading the Churchill & Sherman tanks onto transports - the Co-op (then a pub) on Fort Rd being commandeered as the HQ for all the landing craft crews, and where they planned the operations - Newhaven being the base for the high speed patrol boats looking out for German e-boats in the Channel - all amazing stuff.
Although I knew the local area was used for billeting troops before heading off to Normandy, I never realised that 12,000 of them left via Newhaven on the 5th, bound for the beaches of France - a far bigger number than I ever thought. By the end of August, over 130,000 troops had passed through the town on their way to liberating Europe.

As the historian taking the tour said: its frustrating that Newhaven has become a forgotten part of the D-Day story, when it was in fact a major contributor to the success of Operation Overlord.

Over 200 people went along last night too, which far outweighed what the historian thought he was going to get!
 


sydney

tinky ****in winky
Jul 11, 2003
17,810
town full of eejits
my dad was a commando , parachuted in behind enemy lines on d-day with grenades and mines to create havoc behind enemy lines , 60 of his unit were dropped 8 of them made it back to the coast , 3 of them were at his funeral in 2001 , an RAF jet flew over Findon as we stood outside after the service , everyone looked up at it way up in the sky , it dipped it's wing as it flew over .....i looked at one of the old boys , i only knew him as Taffy , he winked at me , i cried like a baby ....i have tears in my eyes now as i write this , that generation of of men would just not understand what is happening these days....Respect is definitely due.
 




armchairclubber

Well-known member
Aug 8, 2010
1,424
Bexhill
my dad was a commando , parachuted in behind enemy lines on d-day with grenades and mines to create havoc behind enemy lines , 60 of his unit were dropped 8 of them made it back to the coast , 3 of them were at his funeral in 2001 , an RAF jet flew over Findon as we stood outside after the service , everyone looked up at it way up in the sky , it dipped it's wing as it flew over .....i looked at one of the old boys , i only knew him as Taffy , he winked at me , i cried like a baby ....i have tears in my eyes now as i write this , that generation of of men would just not understand what is happening these days....Respect is definitely due.

I think they would Sydney.

I think they would. 😉
 


Weststander

Well-known member
NSC Patron
Aug 25, 2011
66,194
Withdean area
I don't think we ever directly learnt about any wars as such, unless you count The Troubles (which you probably should but again was more to do with the 500 years leading up to it than the actual Troubles themselves). And the trip to Flanders to visit the First World War cemeteries and memorials there.

One of the deputy heads / IT teachers was very into his history and I suspect was responsible for arranging a trip up to Newhaven Fort to listen to a survivor of the Holocaust talk about their experience, which I'm sad to admit I don't remember in anywhere near as much detail as I should do.

“IT teachers” didn’t exist in my era :mad:
 








Westdene Seagull

aka Cap'n Carl Firecrotch
NSC Patron
Oct 27, 2003
21,311
The arse end of Hangleton
Always had a huge interest in WW2, and especially D-Day, since I was a kid. My granddad served in the RNVR on the Atlantic convoys, & later the RN, but while he had no direct link to 6 June, I always remember him on this day - as well as all those lads that left these shores to land in Normandy, many never to return.

Ive just spent a few minutes before work sitting on the cliff tops at Peacehaven, overlooking Newhaven harbour, listening to radio Sussex and some of the stories they are telling. Brought a tear to my eye visualising what went on 80 years ago today.

If anyone is interested, at 8pm tonight there is a walking tour along Newhaven harbour front, run by staff of Newhaven Fort, telling of how Newhaven played a part in Operation Overlord, followed by a beacon lighting in the harbour by the RNLI station.
My Grandad served in the RN for 30 years - this included, and why I'm quoting you, the Atlantic and Russia conveys. A few months before D Day he was moved to another ship but didn't know why. That ship was then involved in the attacks on German positions in Northern France. He rarely spoke about D Day and the few days after but he did speak regularly about his non-war years in the RN. Heros every single one. :salute:
 




Nicks

Well-known member
my dad was a commando , parachuted in behind enemy lines on d-day with grenades and mines to create havoc behind enemy lines , 60 of his unit were dropped 8 of them made it back to the coast , 3 of them were at his funeral in 2001 , an RAF jet flew over Findon as we stood outside after the service , everyone looked up at it way up in the sky , it dipped it's wing as it flew over .....i looked at one of the old boys , i only knew him as Taffy , he winked at me , i cried like a baby ....i have tears in my eyes now as i write this , that generation of of men would just not understand what is happening these days....Respect is definitely due.
Utmost Respect
 




portlock seagull

Why? Why us?
Jul 28, 2003
17,498
We did the History Walking Tour through Newhaven last night - a wonderful hour learning so much more than I already knew.

The (still there) slipway in the harbour that was specifically built for loading the Churchill & Sherman tanks onto transports - the Co-op (then a pub) on Fort Rd being commandeered as the HQ for all the landing craft crews, and where they planned the operations - Newhaven being the base for the high speed patrol boats looking out for German e-boats in the Channel - all amazing stuff.
Although I knew the local area was used for billeting troops before heading off to Normandy, I never realised that 12,000 of them left via Newhaven on the 5th, bound for the beaches of France - a far bigger number than I ever thought. By the end of August, over 130,000 troops had passed through the town on their way to liberating Europe.

As the historian taking the tour said: its frustrating that Newhaven has become a forgotten part of the D-Day story, when it was in fact a major contributor to the success of Operation Overlord.

Over 200 people went along last night too, which far outweighed what the historian thought he was going to get!
I take issue with the liberal use of the forgotten tag by historians. It’s so disingenuous! New haven isn’t forgotten, nor any other port nor anybody that took part. Everyone’s had a mention down the years. The frontline chaps rightly get the limelight over say a factory worker (even though thousands also died in industrial accidents); but doesn’t mean others are forgotten. Just not enough time to go into everything every year on the anniversary. But if you care to look and read or visit over the years as I have then I honestly don’t believe a single story has been missed in the general sense. Every contribution has been acknowledged, even though the canvas is vast. They certainly aren’t forgotten and never will be by those interested in like you and I.
 


Weststander

Well-known member
NSC Patron
Aug 25, 2011
66,194
Withdean area
I take issue with the liberal use of the forgotten tag by historians. It’s so disingenuous! New haven isn’t forgotten, nor any other port nor anybody that took part. Everyone’s had a mention down the years. The frontline chaps rightly get the limelight over say a factory worker (even though thousands also died in industrial accidents); but doesn’t mean others are forgotten. Just not enough time to go into everything every year on the anniversary. But if you care to look and read or visit over the years as I have then I honestly don’t believe a single story has been missed in the general sense. Every contribution has been acknowledged, even though the canvas is vast. They certainly aren’t forgotten and never will be by those interested in like you and I.

I went to school in Newhaven. The contribution to D-Day and the Normandy campaign was never mentioned. Genuinely, I was pleasantly surprised to hear it on regional news this week. Similarly, Shoreham Harbour.

You literally only ever heard about Portsmouth or Weymouth.

A positive thing in 2024 .... wondering if people have woken up to these things, the wider story.
 


Albion and Premier League latest from Sky Sports


Top
Link Here