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[News] Battle of Britain Sunday



jakarta

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
15,620
Sullington
BoB Day should be 15th but this is closest Sunday so St Mary's Storrington having its service tomorrow.

We have a BoB Pilot (Flight Lt. Carl Davis DFC 601 Squadron AAF) KIA 09.09.40 while flying a Hurricane out of Tangmere, buried in the Churchyard and the service always concludes at his graveside, with local British Legion/RAFA/ATC Squadron laying wreaths.

Any other NSCers attending BoB services?
 




The Clamp

Well-known member
NSC Patron
Jan 11, 2016
24,409
West is BEST
Will be meeting my old Air Training Corps classmates for a stroll up to Lancing college chapel. Lancing College was used as an aerial muster landmark during the Battle of Britain. A spitfire came down nearby apparently but I’m not sure exactly where.
 
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jakarta

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
15,620
Sullington
Will be meeting my old Air Training Corp classmates for a stroll up to Lancing college chapel. Lancing College was used as an aerial muster landmark during the Battle of Britain. A spitfire came down nearby apparently but I’m not sure exactly where.

Lots of RAF and Luftwaffe came down here in West Sussex in 1940 apparently a Bf110 less than a mile from where I live at Washington plus a Bf109 force landed at the far end (Cootham) of the village. A Hurricane force landed in Pulborough as well. I'm sure there were more!
 


Weststander

Well-known member
NSC Patron
Aug 25, 2011
63,856
Withdean area
I’m not.

But at Birling Gap last Saturday a lone, unmistakable Spitfire flew past twice. 82 years ago those same skies would’ve been abuzz with planes flown by brave Brits, Poles, Czechs, Belgians and Frenchmen, sent up to destroy far more greater numbers of Nazis.

We’ll always owe them everything. RIP.
 


The Clamp

Well-known member
NSC Patron
Jan 11, 2016
24,409
West is BEST
Lots of RAF and Luftwaffe came down here in West Sussex in 1940 apparently a Bf110 less than a mile from where I live at Washington plus a Bf109 force landed at the far end (Cootham) of the village. A Hurricane force landed in Pulborough as well. I'm sure there were more!

Indeed. Lots of ordinance ditched on the Downs too before the Luftwaffe headed back across the channel. Some of the craters are very visible even today.
 




The Clamp

Well-known member
NSC Patron
Jan 11, 2016
24,409
West is BEST
I’m not.

But at Birling Gap last Saturday a lone, unmistakable Spitfire flew past twice. 82 years ago those same skies would’ve been abuzz with planes flown by brave Brits, Poles, Czechs, Belgians and Frenchmen, sent up to destroy far more greater numbers of Nazis.

We’ll always owe them everything. RIP.

Many people don’t know that many nationalities flew for Britain. Saved our bacon.
 








BrightonCottager

Well-known member
Sep 30, 2013
2,146
Brighton
Many people don’t know that many nationalities flew for Britain. Saved our bacon.
True. I grew up in Ruislip near RAF Northolt where the Polish pilots were largely based. They get a patronising treatment in the BoB film but played a big part in it flying Hurricanes. (@AmexRuislip will know all about this). If you are on the A40 leaving London there's a memorial to them at the Ruislip / Northolt junction. If you're into BoB history the museum at the old RAF Uxbridge station is worth a visit. It includes the underground RAF Fighter Commandcentre that features in the film.

On a related note, a mate of mine who lives in Balfour Road bought his house from an old lady who'd lived there for decades including through the war. When he lifted the carpets in a bedroom he found a section of replaced floorboards and a clipping from the Anus about a German WW2 bomber that had dropped a fire bomb through the roof. Luckily it was on a house that had an extinguisher - every 5th one had them - and the fire was put out before it took hold.
 




jakarta

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
15,620
Sullington
Thanks, I shall read that with interest.

Not at all, 601 AAF were known as the 'Millionaires Squadron' as they were an an RAF Auxilary Squadron and most members had their own aircraft.

Probably out of print but their squadron history 'The Flying Sword' is a good read, if only to see who flew with them.
 






jakarta

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
15,620
Sullington
Worth remembering today is officially the 82nd anniversary of Battle of Britain Day, the last time the Luftwaffe sent huge amounts of aircraft at London during the day and had 60 of them shot down.

Which made them realise they had shot their bolt and they would now have to bomb at night.

More importantly as a consequence the Invasion (Sealion) was postponed - as it turned out of course indefinitely...

Would be great to see a Spitfire over Westminster today!
 






Barrow Boy

Well-known member
NSC Patron
Nov 2, 2007
5,780
GOSBTS
Indeed. Lots of ordinance ditched on the Downs too before the Luftwaffe headed back across the channel. Some of the craters are very visible even today.

Not related to The Battle of Britain, but my mother was in Hospital in 1944, giving birth to my older brother, when they brought the casualties in from 'Micky Mouse Town' (as North Lancing bungalow estate was nicknamed), when it had been hit by the Luftwaffe as they jettisoned their bombs after an unsuccessful raid on London. The memory stayed with my mother for the rest of her life.

I think I have mentioned these two books before on different threads, but anyone with an interest in The Battle of Britain I would advise them to read,
The Most Dangerous Enemy by Stephen Bungay, which is recognised as the definitive history of The Battle of Britain. The book title comes from a quote by Oberst Beppo Schmid, head of Luftwaffe Intelligence in 1939, expressing his considered opinion that "Britain's RAF would be the most dangerous enemy the Luftwaffe might face in the future and that war should be avoided if possible".

The second book is First Light by Geoffrey Wellum, It's a story of a boy who became a man in the War-Torn skies during The Battle of Britain and beyond. This is one of the few books that I have read over again as soon as I had finished it, his first hand descriptions of specific moments in training and actual operations made my hands sweat as he was able to bring you right into the cockpit with him, a stunning book.
 


Official Old Man

Uckfield Seagull
Aug 27, 2011
8,529
Brighton
I'd like to tell you a story my Father told me about 50 years ago. He was born in 1932 so still a child during the war but at the time lived in Albourne. He told the story of a doodlebug coming over and coming down nearby, I'm guessing not that near though. Him and his two younger brothers (they backed up this story) went to find it and came back with bits of the fuselage. They then buried it in the garden. All this was way back in the war days of 1944/5
His parents, my grandparents, moved house around 35 years ago and my Father insisted we search the corner of the garden for this piece of fuselage. And incredibly, after all those years, we couldn't find it!
None of those involved in the story are alive now but the house is still there and the garden is waiting for someone to go over it with a metal detector.
 


Seagull over Canaryland

Well-known member
Feb 8, 2011
3,549
Norfolk
A local churchyard here at Bircham and near the former RAF Bircham Newton airbase, features a fine Commonwealth War Grave memorial garden, containing several rows of neatly tended WW2 RAF graves. Several from 1940. Many from New Zealand.

Rather poignantly, off to one side, but sharing the same memorial garden, is a row of Luftwaffe graves.

Curiously, among the RAF graves is a further, single Luftwaffe grave. I believe this was an error but the local community insisted the Luftwaffe airman be allowed to remain in peace, where he was originally laid to rest.

They were all very young men who made the same sacrifice.
 


Deportivo Seagull

I should coco
Jul 22, 2003
4,898
Mid Sussex
A local churchyard here at Bircham and near the former RAF Bircham Newton airbase, features a fine Commonwealth War Grave memorial garden, containing several rows of neatly tended WW2 RAF graves. Several from 1940. Many from New Zealand.

Rather poignantly, off to one side, but sharing the same memorial garden, is a row of Luftwaffe graves.

Curiously, among the RAF graves is a further, single Luftwaffe grave. I believe this was an error but the local community insisted the Luftwaffe airman be allowed to remain in peace, where he was originally laid to rest.

They were all very young men who made the same sacrifice.

Not Battle of Britain related but the photo is of my oppo (we joined up together) at the German war grave at St. Symphorian.

5190ed8a4a60a5dc939c81500442a3bf.jpg



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 




jakarta

Well-known member
May 25, 2007
15,620
Sullington
Not related to The Battle of Britain, but my mother was in Hospital in 1944, giving birth to my older brother, when they brought the casualties in from 'Micky Mouse Town' (as North Lancing bungalow estate was nicknamed), when it had been hit by the Luftwaffe as they jettisoned their bombs after an unsuccessful raid on London. The memory stayed with my mother for the rest of her life.

I think I have mentioned these two books before on different threads, but anyone with an interest in The Battle of Britain I would advise them to read,
The Most Dangerous Enemy by Stephen Bungay, which is recognised as the definitive history of The Battle of Britain. The book title comes from a quote by Oberst Beppo Schmid, head of Luftwaffe Intelligence in 1939, expressing his considered opinion that "Britain's RAF would be the most dangerous enemy the Luftwaffe might face in the future and that war should be avoided if possible".

The second book is First Light by Geoffrey Wellum, It's a story of a boy who became a man in the War-Torn skies during The Battle of Britain and beyond. This is one of the few books that I have read over again as soon as I had finished it, his first hand descriptions of specific moments in training and actual operations made my hands sweat as he was able to bring you right into the cockpit with him, a stunning book.

Agree with both of these, the Bungay book is the best history of the battle I have read and 'Boy' Wellums story is astonishing for a teenager essentially given the keys to a Spitfire and told to get on with it...
 


Worried Man Blues

Well-known member
Feb 28, 2009
6,606
Swansea
Quite a few bombers came down in the Brecons, we have been to one site. Quite a few people paying their respects, very sad.
 


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