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  1. #16431
    Members dazzer6666's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
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    I only went and did it!

    I arrived in Phoenix on Thursday, feeling tired and not particularly confident after a really bad night's sleep the night before. However, this turned out to be a blessing in disguise because I had the best night's sleep and woke up on Friday feeling great. That was a day for expo, cramming in those last carbs and putting my feet up.

    I NEVER sleep well the night before a race (does anyone?), so I wasn't too annoyed when I didn't get to sleep until well after midnight with my alarm set for 3:45am (thankfully that's 5:45am Toronto time). It wasn't the best start to the day when our taxi failed to turn up and the estimated time of the Uber we then booked kept getting later. Luckily there was a couple catching their own Uber and they kindly let us jump in with them. That's one thing I always like about America.

    We arrived at the finish line and everyone had to join a huge queue to board one of those big yellow school buses to take us to the start line. It turned out I'd timed it perfectly, by the time I'd get off the bus, queued up for the toilet, and dropped my bag off it was only 10 minutes until the start. That start time was 6:30am, so it was still dark and they provided patio heaters for us to stand under as it was about 5C and didn't get above about 8C for the whole race.

    The important bit. A (quite deafening) firework set us off and there's that sudden realisation that I'm actually doing this race I've trained so hard for. As you probably know, 3 hours was my target, which is an average pace of around 4:15 per km. For the first couple of km I was running alongside the 3:00 pacer which seemed like a good idea. For some reason he went off at a 4:00/km pace and the guy next to me and I said to each other "he's going way too fast, let's set our own pace". So I kept with this guy until around 8km when we turned and started the only real climb on the course. Halfway up this climb I found myself overtaking the pacer because he'd slowed it right down. i'm so glad I didn't stick with him as I really like to try and keep a consistent pace.

    The first half of the race is pretty much all downhill apart from that one climb which is about a mile long. It's the prettiest part of the course, the sun rises behind you and you're surrounded by the desert and hundreds of cacti. I crossed the halfway mark at 1:27, way ahead of target. I felt great but there's always that fear you've gone off too hard. The second half is almost completely flat and runs along typical wide suburban roads. Less scenic but at least there were some spectators to cheer us on. I found myself running with a few people and we'd often be trading places as we'd have those ups and downs in energy at different times.

    The last 10k was hard, REALLY hard. My brain was telling me to stop and I just had to keep willing myself to move forward. At one point I was following this guy at a steady pace and suddenly realised he'd slowed right down, so I forced myself past him and latched on to the next guy. I was just counting down those last turns and my friend was standing 500m from the finish shouting support as my legs just kept going. Then I crossed the line, stopped my watch, and it said 2:56:34. I'm not normally one to get very emotional but I stumbled around for a bit not knowing how to react, then someone put a medal around my neck and I started crying.

    I still can't quite believe, over a day later. If you'd said to me 2 years ago I'd run a sub 3 hour marathon, I'd have thought you were mad.
    Outstanding effort, bloody well done
    Great write-up too

    Good running too @big nuts

    In awe of you speedy guys .
    "Prejudice is a great time saver. You can form opinions without having to get the facts"

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    • #16432
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      Fantastic @Badger - well done!
    • #16433
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      Excellent execution @Badger. Great training and race discipline. Congratulations on perfect run and being first NSC sub 3 hour by some way. Good use of other runners to get through the wall, metal slatty fence, razor wire or whatever you wanna call it.

      Boston calling?
    • #16434

      1 Not allowed!
      Well done @Badger Very impressive!
    • #16435

      1 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
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      I only went and did it!

      I arrived in Phoenix on Thursday, feeling tired and not particularly confident after a really bad night's sleep the night before. However, this turned out to be a blessing in disguise because I had the best night's sleep and woke up on Friday feeling great. That was a day for expo, cramming in those last carbs and putting my feet up.

      I NEVER sleep well the night before a race (does anyone?), so I wasn't too annoyed when I didn't get to sleep until well after midnight with my alarm set for 3:45am (thankfully that's 5:45am Toronto time). It wasn't the best start to the day when our taxi failed to turn up and the estimated time of the Uber we then booked kept getting later. Luckily there was a couple catching their own Uber and they kindly let us jump in with them. That's one thing I always like about America.

      We arrived at the finish line and everyone had to join a huge queue to board one of those big yellow school buses to take us to the start line. It turned out I'd timed it perfectly, by the time I'd get off the bus, queued up for the toilet, and dropped my bag off it was only 10 minutes until the start. That start time was 6:30am, so it was still dark and they provided patio heaters for us to stand under as it was about 5C and didn't get above about 8C for the whole race.

      The important bit. A (quite deafening) firework set us off and there's that sudden realisation that I'm actually doing this race I've trained so hard for. As you probably know, 3 hours was my target, which is an average pace of around 4:15 per km. For the first couple of km I was running alongside the 3:00 pacer which seemed like a good idea. For some reason he went off at a 4:00/km pace and the guy next to me and I said to each other "he's going way too fast, let's set our own pace". So I kept with this guy until around 8km when we turned and started the only real climb on the course. Halfway up this climb I found myself overtaking the pacer because he'd slowed it right down. i'm so glad I didn't stick with him as I really like to try and keep a consistent pace.

      The first half of the race is pretty much all downhill apart from that one climb which is about a mile long. It's the prettiest part of the course, the sun rises behind you and you're surrounded by the desert and hundreds of cacti. I crossed the halfway mark at 1:27, way ahead of target. I felt great but there's always that fear you've gone off too hard. The second half is almost completely flat and runs along typical wide suburban roads. Less scenic but at least there were some spectators to cheer us on. I found myself running with a few people and we'd often be trading places as we'd have those ups and downs in energy at different times.

      The last 10k was hard, REALLY hard. My brain was telling me to stop and I just had to keep willing myself to move forward. At one point I was following this guy at a steady pace and suddenly realised he'd slowed right down, so I forced myself past him and latched on to the next guy. I was just counting down those last turns and my friend was standing 500m from the finish shouting support as my legs just kept going. Then I crossed the line, stopped my watch, and it said 2:56:34. I'm not normally one to get very emotional but I stumbled around for a bit not knowing how to react, then someone put a medal around my neck and I started crying.

      I still can't quite believe, over a day later. If you'd said to me 2 years ago I'd run a sub 3 hour marathon, I'd have thought you were mad.
      Fantastic effort! Many congratulations, too – a well-deserved place on the NSC ORT Honours board.

      Top race report, too – sounded like you executed your plan to perfection...
    • #16436
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      Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
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      I only went and did it!

      I arrived in Phoenix on Thursday, feeling tired and not particularly confident after a really bad night's sleep the night before. However, this turned out to be a blessing in disguise because I had the best night's sleep and woke up on Friday feeling great. That was a day for expo, cramming in those last carbs and putting my feet up.

      I NEVER sleep well the night before a race (does anyone?), so I wasn't too annoyed when I didn't get to sleep until well after midnight with my alarm set for 3:45am (thankfully that's 5:45am Toronto time). It wasn't the best start to the day when our taxi failed to turn up and the estimated time of the Uber we then booked kept getting later. Luckily there was a couple catching their own Uber and they kindly let us jump in with them. That's one thing I always like about America.

      We arrived at the finish line and everyone had to join a huge queue to board one of those big yellow school buses to take us to the start line. It turned out I'd timed it perfectly, by the time I'd get off the bus, queued up for the toilet, and dropped my bag off it was only 10 minutes until the start. That start time was 6:30am, so it was still dark and they provided patio heaters for us to stand under as it was about 5C and didn't get above about 8C for the whole race.

      The important bit. A (quite deafening) firework set us off and there's that sudden realisation that I'm actually doing this race I've trained so hard for. As you probably know, 3 hours was my target, which is an average pace of around 4:15 per km. For the first couple of km I was running alongside the 3:00 pacer which seemed like a good idea. For some reason he went off at a 4:00/km pace and the guy next to me and I said to each other "he's going way too fast, let's set our own pace". So I kept with this guy until around 8km when we turned and started the only real climb on the course. Halfway up this climb I found myself overtaking the pacer because he'd slowed it right down. i'm so glad I didn't stick with him as I really like to try and keep a consistent pace.

      The first half of the race is pretty much all downhill apart from that one climb which is about a mile long. It's the prettiest part of the course, the sun rises behind you and you're surrounded by the desert and hundreds of cacti. I crossed the halfway mark at 1:27, way ahead of target. I felt great but there's always that fear you've gone off too hard. The second half is almost completely flat and runs along typical wide suburban roads. Less scenic but at least there were some spectators to cheer us on. I found myself running with a few people and we'd often be trading places as we'd have those ups and downs in energy at different times.

      The last 10k was hard, REALLY hard. My brain was telling me to stop and I just had to keep willing myself to move forward. At one point I was following this guy at a steady pace and suddenly realised he'd slowed right down, so I forced myself past him and latched on to the next guy. I was just counting down those last turns and my friend was standing 500m from the finish shouting support as my legs just kept going. Then I crossed the line, stopped my watch, and it said 2:56:34. I'm not normally one to get very emotional but I stumbled around for a bit not knowing how to react, then someone put a medal around my neck and I started crying.

      I still can't quite believe, over a day later. If you'd said to me 2 years ago I'd run a sub 3 hour marathon, I'd have thought you were mad.
      Outstanding. That 4.15 km pace would be a good 5k for some of us around here!
    • #16437
      Mod writer Guinness Boy's Avatar
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      Tremendous running @Badger well played.
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    • #16438

      1 Not allowed!
      Brilliant running Badger! Sub 3 hour is something to be proud of. As for that pacer, I'm surprised a runner of that ability and you would think experience, going off too fast which could easily have messed your attempt right up. Well done on sticking to your own plan.
    • #16439
      Members Herr Tubthumper's Avatar
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      1 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
      This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
      I only went and did it!

      I arrived in Phoenix on Thursday, feeling tired and not particularly confident after a really bad night's sleep the night before. However, this turned out to be a blessing in disguise because I had the best night's sleep and woke up on Friday feeling great. That was a day for expo, cramming in those last carbs and putting my feet up.

      I NEVER sleep well the night before a race (does anyone?), so I wasn't too annoyed when I didn't get to sleep until well after midnight with my alarm set for 3:45am (thankfully that's 5:45am Toronto time). It wasn't the best start to the day when our taxi failed to turn up and the estimated time of the Uber we then booked kept getting later. Luckily there was a couple catching their own Uber and they kindly let us jump in with them. That's one thing I always like about America.

      We arrived at the finish line and everyone had to join a huge queue to board one of those big yellow school buses to take us to the start line. It turned out I'd timed it perfectly, by the time I'd get off the bus, queued up for the toilet, and dropped my bag off it was only 10 minutes until the start. That start time was 6:30am, so it was still dark and they provided patio heaters for us to stand under as it was about 5C and didn't get above about 8C for the whole race.

      The important bit. A (quite deafening) firework set us off and there's that sudden realisation that I'm actually doing this race I've trained so hard for. As you probably know, 3 hours was my target, which is an average pace of around 4:15 per km. For the first couple of km I was running alongside the 3:00 pacer which seemed like a good idea. For some reason he went off at a 4:00/km pace and the guy next to me and I said to each other "he's going way too fast, let's set our own pace". So I kept with this guy until around 8km when we turned and started the only real climb on the course. Halfway up this climb I found myself overtaking the pacer because he'd slowed it right down. i'm so glad I didn't stick with him as I really like to try and keep a consistent pace.

      The first half of the race is pretty much all downhill apart from that one climb which is about a mile long. It's the prettiest part of the course, the sun rises behind you and you're surrounded by the desert and hundreds of cacti. I crossed the halfway mark at 1:27, way ahead of target. I felt great but there's always that fear you've gone off too hard. The second half is almost completely flat and runs along typical wide suburban roads. Less scenic but at least there were some spectators to cheer us on. I found myself running with a few people and we'd often be trading places as we'd have those ups and downs in energy at different times.

      The last 10k was hard, REALLY hard. My brain was telling me to stop and I just had to keep willing myself to move forward. At one point I was following this guy at a steady pace and suddenly realised he'd slowed right down, so I forced myself past him and latched on to the next guy. I was just counting down those last turns and my friend was standing 500m from the finish shouting support as my legs just kept going. Then I crossed the line, stopped my watch, and it said 2:56:34. I'm not normally one to get very emotional but I stumbled around for a bit not knowing how to react, then someone put a medal around my neck and I started crying.

      I still can't quite believe, over a day later. If you'd said to me 2 years ago I'd run a sub 3 hour marathon, I'd have thought you were mad.
      What a fantastic story. I welled up at the end of reading that. Truly exceptional work my friend.

      For some advice from an expert which you clearly are, were you running your long training runs at the sub-3 pace?
      "I will design a town in the image of your face. Round the wrinkles of your eyes my footsteps you can trace. We could promenade down infra-nasel depression. The streets of your hands will never feel a recession."
    • #16440

      1 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
      This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
      I only went and did it!

      I arrived in Phoenix on Thursday, feeling tired and not particularly confident after a really bad night's sleep the night before. However, this turned out to be a blessing in disguise because I had the best night's sleep and woke up on Friday feeling great. That was a day for expo, cramming in those last carbs and putting my feet up.

      I NEVER sleep well the night before a race (does anyone?), so I wasn't too annoyed when I didn't get to sleep until well after midnight with my alarm set for 3:45am (thankfully that's 5:45am Toronto time). It wasn't the best start to the day when our taxi failed to turn up and the estimated time of the Uber we then booked kept getting later. Luckily there was a couple catching their own Uber and they kindly let us jump in with them. That's one thing I always like about America.

      We arrived at the finish line and everyone had to join a huge queue to board one of those big yellow school buses to take us to the start line. It turned out I'd timed it perfectly, by the time I'd get off the bus, queued up for the toilet, and dropped my bag off it was only 10 minutes until the start. That start time was 6:30am, so it was still dark and they provided patio heaters for us to stand under as it was about 5C and didn't get above about 8C for the whole race.

      The important bit. A (quite deafening) firework set us off and there's that sudden realisation that I'm actually doing this race I've trained so hard for. As you probably know, 3 hours was my target, which is an average pace of around 4:15 per km. For the first couple of km I was running alongside the 3:00 pacer which seemed like a good idea. For some reason he went off at a 4:00/km pace and the guy next to me and I said to each other "he's going way too fast, let's set our own pace". So I kept with this guy until around 8km when we turned and started the only real climb on the course. Halfway up this climb I found myself overtaking the pacer because he'd slowed it right down. i'm so glad I didn't stick with him as I really like to try and keep a consistent pace.

      The first half of the race is pretty much all downhill apart from that one climb which is about a mile long. It's the prettiest part of the course, the sun rises behind you and you're surrounded by the desert and hundreds of cacti. I crossed the halfway mark at 1:27, way ahead of target. I felt great but there's always that fear you've gone off too hard. The second half is almost completely flat and runs along typical wide suburban roads. Less scenic but at least there were some spectators to cheer us on. I found myself running with a few people and we'd often be trading places as we'd have those ups and downs in energy at different times.

      The last 10k was hard, REALLY hard. My brain was telling me to stop and I just had to keep willing myself to move forward. At one point I was following this guy at a steady pace and suddenly realised he'd slowed right down, so I forced myself past him and latched on to the next guy. I was just counting down those last turns and my friend was standing 500m from the finish shouting support as my legs just kept going. Then I crossed the line, stopped my watch, and it said 2:56:34. I'm not normally one to get very emotional but I stumbled around for a bit not knowing how to react, then someone put a medal around my neck and I started crying.

      I still can't quite believe, over a day later. If you'd said to me 2 years ago I'd run a sub 3 hour marathon, I'd have thought you were mad.

      Well done!

      Did the 3 hour pacer make it though?
      In this great future you can't forget your past

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