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  1. #61
    Members Gritt23's Avatar
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    1 Not allowed!
    Quote Originally Posted by Farehamseagull View Post
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    My brother in law is a brickie so I have helped him out a couple of times and I'm going to go on a part time course and work a bit with him at weekends whilst still working full time to hopefully train up to start working in the building industry. It will also mean that some of the experience I've built up in property will still go to a little use.
    I work in the Construction Industry - desk job, so I know little about actually being on the tools - and from any labour meetings I attend, there has been a chronic shortage of brickies for a while now. You're brother-in-law will have seen it from the other side, but I bet he's never short of work, as they've been like rocking horse shit lately.

    But, as you've found out, it's not just about money, it's about finding something you like to do, and can see doing for some years. Getting a trade doesn't mean you are on the tools all your life either, as you get a team around you, set a company up, and your job is winning the work, and managing the job, while others are stood up on the scaffolding actually laying the bricks.
    "I looked straight across to Graham Turner and their whole bench was in tears."

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    • #62
      LUZZING chairs about Wilko's Avatar
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      3 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Pogue Mahone View Post
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      Are you a teacher? I was a full time Primary Teacher for 24 years, but had had enough two years ago, and gave it up. but am still a teacher, now working supply. The stress has lifted from my shoulders. I sleep well, and am substantially happier.

      I work pretty much full time, and am employed by three schools so don't have to bother much with agency work (which is poorly paid, and which I resent). I love it - it reminds me what I always loved about teaching.
      Similar, I was a full time international teacher as head of 6th form which I enjoyed but was very stressful and took up a lot of my time. When I moved back to England last year I took a job just teaching, 70% contract and no responsibilities. I use my spare time to write blogs and textbooks. My quality of life has jumped up, I have less money but I do not really care, I am much happier and really value my extra free time.
    • #63
      Members Not Andy Naylor's Avatar
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      1 Not allowed!
      I didn't make a change as radical as yours (although I do work outdoors in the cold quite often now) but I did change careers in my late thirties and have never regretted it for a nanosecond. By that age you know what you want and, more importantly, what you don't. Family and financial obligations are factors that could weigh against a change but you seem to be okay there so make the move and don't look back.
      England are still the only team to have won the World Cup wearing red shirts.
    • #64

      1 Not allowed!
      My advise is to go back to school. Either college or open university and get the qualifications you need to do the job you really wouldike to do. Obviously within reason , if you are not especially academic you are not going to be a brain surgeon. However there are plenty of other jobs you can do that require only a basic degree that will separate you from people who don't have any qualifications and give you much more choice of jobs. You are also more likely to find a job that interests you and is forfilling as opposed to with respect putting up scaffolding or lugging bricks around on building sites.

      Ps. No slight intended to anyone that puts up scaffolding for a living or is a brickie - the point I was trying to make is that most kids dont grow up aspiring to do a non skilled job they just fall into it because they didn't do well at school. In life you sometimes have a second chance to go out and get the qualifications you want because when you are older you take it perhaps more seriously than as a kid. I know some scaffolding and brickies and they all earn ok money.but as far as I'm aware none of them aspired to be one at school. They aspired to be architects and doctors etc
      Last edited by Live by the sea; 30-10-2018 at 13:09.
    • #65
      Members Bakero's Avatar
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      0 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Live by the sea View Post
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      My advise is to go back to school. Either college or open university and get the qualifications you need to do the job you really wouldike to do. Obviously within reason , if you are not especially academic you are not going to be a brain surgeon. However there are plenty of other jobs you can do that require only a basic degree that will separate you from people who don't have any qualifications and give you much more choice of jobs. You are also more likely to find a job that interests you and is forfilling as opposed to with respect putting up scaffolding or lugging bricks around on building sites.

      Ps. No slight intended to anyone that puts up scaffolding for a living or is a brickie - the point I was trying to make is that most kids dont grow up aspiring to do a non skilled job they just fall into it because they didn't do well at school. In life you sometimes have a second chance to go out and get the qualifications you want because when you are older you take it perhaps more seriously than as a kid. I know some scaffolding and brickies and they all earn ok money.but as far as I'm aware none of them aspired to be one at school. They aspired to be architects and doctors etc
      How is being a brickie unskilled?
    • #66
      Members middletoenail's Avatar
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      0 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Bakero View Post
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      How is being a brickie unskilled?
      By academic qualifications, it's unskilled. I'm not saying that as a slight, I'm just as 'unskilled', yet I'm doing ok.
    • #67
      Members Geestar's Avatar
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      0 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Pogue Mahone View Post
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      Are you a teacher? I was a full time Primary Teacher for 24 years, but had had enough two years ago, and gave it up. but am still a teacher, now working supply. The stress has lifted from my shoulders. I sleep well, and am substantially happier.

      I work pretty much full time, and am employed by three schools so don't have to bother much with agency work (which is poorly paid, and which I resent). I love it - it reminds me what I always loved about teaching.
      Yeah I was a teacher, mainly supply teaching. Then moved to an agency as an education recruitment consultant.

      Now just want to stay clear of the whole education system

      Sent from my TA-1020 using Tapatalk
    • #68

      0 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Bakero View Post
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      How is being a brickie unskilled?
      You can be taught the job from another brickie. You don't need any academic qualifications to get the job. This is the same for some other manual labour intensive jobs. You can be taught how to do it on site so to speak. An electrician for example doesn't need a degree but does need to pass the exams to demonstrate his comptency. I'm aware sometimes I write in a matter of fact way and some people might think I'm a bit abrupt but I do not intend to cause offence or belittle anyone that does bricklaying etc, it looks like bloody hard work. However you don't need to do well at school to do the job. You do need to do well at school academically if you want to enter a professional field. Like dentistry, doctor, surveyor etc which personally I want my kids to aspire to .
    • #69
      NOT the Honey Badger Badger's Avatar
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      0 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Justice View Post
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      It’s not easy training as a plumber sparks etc I’m a sparks and 30 years on still learning. These wankers that do crash courses are a ****ing embarrassment to the trade please don’t become one of those your get caught out in the end.
      Quote Originally Posted by PoG View Post
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      Programming can be easy, programming well not so easy. That said what jobs you got on offer?
      What @Justice says definitely applies to programming. I've spent 5 years studying for a BSc and MSc in Computer Science; had over 10 years experience as a software developer; and I'm still learning new things every day. People who just go on a programming course and try and do it for a living will soon get found out. I've spent way too much time clearing up messes of code written by poor, inexperienced programmers.

      That said, if you go about it the right way, it can work out well. Sometimes it's useful to have a developer who's worked in another industry and can give a different perspective. Just stick to the simpler tasks until you can learn enough from other people.
      Abso-bloody-exactly
    • #70

      1 Not allowed!
      I resigned from the Home Office because I hated it and ended up with my own accountancy practice. I fully concur with the the majority of posters on this thread who espouse the "Go For It! message, but with one word of caution.

      Success or failure can depend much upon timing. I started out in accountancy in year one of Self-Assessment, so a massive change to the industry and a massive upsurge in demand for accountants. As an accountant I see the uncertainty caused by Brexit and I wouldn't be making any life-changing decisions now until the dust has settled on that score.
      "Intercluderent aut mori"

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