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  1. #1
    Members Stat Brother's Avatar
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    The 'Dambusters' raid, 75 years ago today (and tomorrow).


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    On this day in 1943, 75 years ago, one of the most dangerous events of WWII took place: Operation Chastise! This was an attack on German industrial dams by British dambusters using Barnes Wallis’s bouncing bomb! Sadly, 53 RAF pilots lost their lives.

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    “Melancholy is incompatible with bicycling.” James E Starrs
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    • #2
      Well, is it? Is it PotG?'s Avatar
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      3 Not allowed!


      Heroes all
    • #3

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      Quote Originally Posted by Stat Brother View Post
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      On this day in 1943, 75 years ago, one of the most dangerous events of WWII took place: Operation Chastise! This was an attack on German industrial dams by British dambusters using Barnes Wallis’s bouncing bomb! Sadly, 53 RAF pilots lost their lives.

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      Thanks for that one SB, I may just watch the movie again this evening !
    • #4

      2 Not allowed!
      Just a small correction - 53 aircrew (not pilots) lost their lives.
      Not trying to take anything away from the bravery of those involved...
    • #5
      Dullard Thunder Bolt's Avatar
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      Quote Originally Posted by Is it PotG? View Post
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      Heroes all
      The last survivor Johnny Johnson said they weren't heroes. They just had a job to do.
      Quote Originally Posted by brighton bluenose View Post
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      NSC at its very best ~ a post based on assumption on a matter the poster hasn't got a clue about!!
      When people are rude to you, they reveal who they are, not who you are.
    • #6
      Longing for retirement. AmexRuislip's Avatar
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      Britain's last surviving Dambuster - Sq Ld George Leonard 'Johnnie' Johnson, 95, who served in one of WWII's most daring aerial operations.
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      Please sign this
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      Ever since I was a young boy, I've played the silver ball.
      From Soho down to Brighton, I must have played them all.
    • #7
      Members spongy's Avatar
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      28 Not allowed!
      My nan's brother (so great uncle??) Was a dam buster navigator on a Lancaster.

      My mum found all his old war letters and medals in a box in the loft of my nan's house.

      My dad saw them and wanted to know more so did a LOAD of research wanting to know more.

      Since found out loads. He was shot down over the channel just over the Belgian coast on the return of his 23rd sortie.

      We even have the location he was shot down. Where the wreck was found, his squadron, crew, plane number and nickname. (Can't remember exact details off hand)

      My dad also found a whole load of WWII maps that he used with notes scribbled on them to help him. They're in almost pristine condition. Not worth a lot in monetary terms but at the same time invaluable memorabilia.

      During his research he went with my mum up to RAF Coningsby where the Memorial Flight Lancaster is based and took all the letters and maps with him.

      The Lancaster was grounded as it was having repair work done but they spent hours in the museum and having a look around.

      They went to a cafe to have a coffee and two blokes in airsuits sat near them. My dad being dad started a conversation asking if they were pilots and was told that they were called Roger and Ian the pilot and navigator of the Lancaster.

      It was then that my dad said "I have something in my bag that may interest you" and preceded to show them all the letters, medals and maps he had.

      The two blokes. Roger Collins the pilot and Ian Shaw the navigator were awestruck and in awe of it all as they're still serving RAF.

      My dad said to Ian that he wanted him to keep two of the maps and gave them to him. At first he wouldn't take them saying they should be museum pieces but my dad insisted. He begrudgingly took them.

      As a thankyou Roger said "come with me I have something to show you". And then took them to the hanger that the Lancaster is stored in. Due to the repairs happening they couldn't start it but the two of them gave my mum and dad a personal tour of the whole plane. Every part of it. Even in the cockpit. He allowed my dad to sit in the pilot seat. My mum refused, even after lots of cajoling but insisted that it was a "mans seat, a seat for heroes" and wasn't comfortable sitting in it.

      Whilst in the cockpit, Ian, the navigator took the two maps and put one on the board and one on the bench area and said " these stay here, and will never be moved, these maps belong on this plane, as part of history, every time this plane flies be safe in the knowledge that they are here as a mark of respect to those few brave souls".

      I personally think it's amazing that my family paid so much and somehow by a twist of luck and being in the right place at the right that they my parents met Roger and Ian.

      If ever you see the Lancaster memorial flight know that there is genuine maps from WWII missions in that cockpit.

      This was 3 years ago this happened and I saw the Lancaster last year flying. I cried at the thought of this and am now writing it.

      My two pennies worth anyway.....
      I feel sorry for people who don't drink because when they wake up, that's the best they are going to feel all day.
    • #8

      1 Not allowed!
      In tribute, I bust my own dam earlier today and nearly gagged afterwards, leaving Thames water with only a slightly smaller mess to clear up than their Eder peers but caused by an altogether different kind of bouncing bomb.

      We salute you Guy Gibson and our immortal crews!
      "Never miss a good chance to shut up"
    • #9
      Members Algernon's Avatar
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      0 Not allowed!
      I've walked across that Dam many a time.
      Always worth a visit if you're ever in that part of Germany.
      Fup off you fuppin' baxter!
    • #10
      Longing for retirement. AmexRuislip's Avatar
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      1 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by spongy View Post
      This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
      My nan's brother (so great uncle??) Was a dam buster navigator on a Lancaster.

      My mum found all his old war letters and medals in a box in the loft of my nan's house.

      My dad saw them and wanted to know more so did a LOAD of research wanting to know more.

      Since found out loads. He was shot down over the channel just over the Belgian coast on the return of his 23rd sortie.

      We even have the location he was shot down. Where the wreck was found, his squadron, crew, plane number and nickname. (Can't remember exact details off hand)

      My dad also found a whole load of WWII maps that he used with notes scribbled on them to help him. They're in almost pristine condition. Not worth a lot in monetary terms but at the same time invaluable memorabilia.

      During his research he went with my mum up to RAF Coningsby where the Memorial Flight Lancaster is based and took all the letters and maps with him.

      The Lancaster was grounded as it was having repair work done but they spent hours in the museum and having a look around.

      They went to a cafe to have a coffee and two blokes in airsuits sat near them. My dad being dad started a conversation asking if they were pilots and was told that they were called Roger and Ian the pilot and navigator of the Lancaster.

      It was then that my dad said "I have something in my bag that may interest you" and preceded to show them all the letters, medals and maps he had.

      The two blokes. Roger Collins the pilot and Ian Shaw the navigator were awestruck and in awe of it all as they're still serving RAF.

      My dad said to Ian that he wanted him to keep two of the maps and gave them to him. At first he wouldn't take them saying they should be museum pieces but my dad insisted. He begrudgingly took them.

      As a thankyou Roger said "come with me I have something to show you". And then took them to the hanger that the Lancaster is stored in. Due to the repairs happening they couldn't start it but the two of them gave my mum and dad a personal tour of the whole plane. Every part of it. Even in the cockpit. He allowed my dad to sit in the pilot seat. My mum refused, even after lots of cajoling but insisted that it was a "mans seat, a seat for heroes" and wasn't comfortable sitting in it.

      Whilst in the cockpit, Ian, the navigator took the two maps and put one on the board and one on the bench area and said " these stay here, and will never be moved, these maps belong on this plane, as part of history, every time this plane flies be safe in the knowledge that they are here as a mark of respect to those few brave souls".

      I personally think it's amazing that my family paid so much and somehow by a twist of luck and being in the right place at the right that they my parents met Roger and Ian.

      If ever you see the Lancaster memorial flight know that there is genuine maps from WWII missions in that cockpit.

      This was 3 years ago this happened and I saw the Lancaster last year flying. I cried at the thought of this and am now writing it.

      My two pennies worth anyway.....
      That's brilliant.
      If you're interested and ever in the area.
      There's a National Trust property, called Hughenden Manor, near Wycombe.
      It only became apparent of how an important part it played in the bombing of Germany in WW2.
      https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/hug...orld-war-story
      Well worth a visit
      Ever since I was a young boy, I've played the silver ball.
      From Soho down to Brighton, I must have played them all.

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