View Poll Results: Which Youth Subculture Did You or Do You Most Identify With?

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  • Casuals

    40 15.15%
  • Goth

    6 2.27%
  • Grunge

    18 6.82%
  • Heavy Metal (Metal Head)

    25 9.47%
  • Hippie

    14 5.30%
  • Hip Hop

    8 3.03%
  • Mod

    36 13.64%
  • New Romantic

    8 3.03%
  • Punk

    37 14.02%
  • Rasta

    2 0.76%
  • Rave

    32 12.12%
  • Rocker / Biker

    9 3.41%
  • Rockabilly

    1 0.38%
  • Skaterboy

    6 2.27%
  • Skinhead / Suedehead

    16 6.06%
  • Soul Boy

    4 1.52%
  • Teddy Boy

    2 0.76%
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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psychobilly freakout View Post
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    Yeah ok, I did not check my spelling before posting... idiot that I am.

    Psychobilly is defiantly a different sub culture they hated each other and would fight when they crossed paths. It is different dress code, everything, but I get your point.
    Unless you belong to a particular subculture you are not going to know all the sub sects and the rivalries amongst those sects. I know of Rockabillys and I know of Psychobillys but I had no idea they were rivals and in conflict with each other. I'd also heard the term scooter boy but just assumed they were part of the mod scene. Would I be right in thinking that Rockabilly had its roots in 50s music whereas psychobilly is more 80s oriented. Always associated the Cramps and Meteors with Psychobilly or are they more the commercial side of things who might be considered uncool amongst hardcore psychobillys. Always quite liked the Cramps. Also Nick Cave who is one of my favourite artists sometimes flirts with a bit of a psychobilly sound I believe but feel free to correct me. Obviously not when he's crooning with Kylie Minogue but some of his songs with the Birthday Party/ Bad Seeds definitely have that influence in my opinion
    Last edited by marlowe; 04-09-2017 at 22:05.

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    • #82
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      When i look back at some of the 'phases' I went through and clothes I wore along with the people I hung around with and different girlfriends I reckon I can apply a few of those terms to various parts of my youth. I guess I was a Casual New Romantic Hippy Mod with a dash of Heavy metal!
    • #83
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      Quote Originally Posted by AmexRuislip View Post
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      Soul Boy, just couldnt get enough of the sounds, classic.
      I knew you was going to say that.
      100% Soul, but I am going to include jazz/funk in with it, as at the time both were played in the clubs.
      Loads of gigs, all dayers/nighters/weekenders.Visiting different clubs all over the South East & London.
      Great times, great music, top totty.
    • #84
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      More than one at various times, so didn't vote in the poll.
    • #85
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      Quote Originally Posted by The Antikythera Mechanism View Post
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      No Teddy Boy's? Surely BG must've been one @BensGrandad
      I'm actually quite interested in what @BensGrandad has to say. I believe BG is about 80 which means he was in his teens in the 50s. This is essentially when proper youth culture was born and was first widely recognised especially in the UK with the advent of Teddy Boys. There weren't really any others to choose from at that time. By the late 1970s there were still quite a few ageing Teds in their 40s who at the time seemed quite ancient but they were still quite a common site in Brighton, but thinking about it the time span of the original teds of the 50s to the 70s is only the same as the original rave scene to today, so not that long really but at the time it seemed they were from a completely different era.Most original Teds now would be in their 70s knocking on 80.
    • #86
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      Quote Originally Posted by maffew View Post
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      Pretty much my first ever music purchase was an 8 pack of tapes from the Edge (formerly the Eclipse) in Coventry

      Back then it was really i suppose before D&B was a genre of its own it was really either dark hardcore or happy hardcore (which was breaks as we know before happy hardcore became its own genre and was pretty much 180 BPM and cheesy as - slower Gabba if you like)

      The pack if IIRC contained (some of them the mixing I could and did do better)

      Jumping Jack Frost
      Grooverider
      Slipmatt
      Top Buzz
      Fabio
      Ratpack

      And I cant remember the other 2 could have been a six pack

      God I miss my tapes the joy of buying those mix packs from Obsession, Fantazia.... Loved the artwork on them too they were the pride of place next to my awai tape deck and collected so many fliers. Moved on to D&B DJing and partying wise and got quite into Dubstep for a while before retiring from parties and festivals

      Happy messy days
      Grooverider (8?) Live at the Eclipse was a colossus IIRC , used to listen to that often "Its a hundred degrees and we're still rising. Hardcore will never die" .

      For me the genre peaked musically, with this beauty .

      Paired beautifully with Snowballs and the odd Black Microdot to give me some of the best nights of my life. Funnily enough I was in a shoegaze band at the time and frequented few indie parties with said combination
      Too many Florence Nightingales. Not enough Robin Hoods.
    • #87
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      The beauty of Brighton is that we never felt the need to go 'all in' to any subculture. The trick was to take the best bits of all, this was epitomised during Big Beat where eclectic record collection came together to make new sounds. All with the help from the bassist from The Housemartins .

      I voted Rave because that seemed to be closest but i would also give a nod to Shoegaze, casual (the clothes not the violence), Britpop/Lad culture of the 90's, Baggy, Most genres of dance music, Punk, Ska, Hippy etc etc
      Too many Florence Nightingales. Not enough Robin Hoods.
    • #88
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      Quote Originally Posted by Raleigh Chopper View Post
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      I knew you was going to say that.
      100% Soul, but I am going to include jazz/funk in with it, as at the time both were played in the clubs.
      Loads of gigs, all dayers/nighters/weekenders.Visiting different clubs all over the South East & London.
      Great times, great music, top totty.
      Did you go to Papillon in the basement of the Queens Hotel? Or the Inn Place (DJ Paul Clark) or the Abinger? Did you do Isle of White weekenders (DJ Chris Hill)? Toga parties?
    • #89
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      Quote Originally Posted by Jackthelad View Post
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      No Brighton was the place to be especially as far as fashion, our casuals were always the best dressed and it wasn't all about hooliganism, the fashion aspect was a big part of it and other teams would come down to Brighton to get kitted out, it had similarities with the Mod scene in that regard.
      Pffff Funny, I was a Brighton casual who went to London to get my stuff!
      Simon Jordan, "Palace could be the Manchester United of the South" - That is why I love having the gypsies as our rivals
    • #90
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      Quote Originally Posted by wellquickwoody View Post
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      Pffff Funny, I was a Brighton casual who went to London to get my stuff!
      I don't remember any shops in Brighton selling Fila,Ellesse and Tachini in the very early 80s.

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