Page 223 of 236 FirstFirst ... 123173213220221222223224225226233 ... LastLast
Results 2,221 to 2,230 of 2357
  1. #2221
    Members Raskolnikov's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Trier, Rheinland-Pflaz
    Posts
    336


    1 Not allowed!
    Immortality by Kundera, not as good as some of his others but still thoroughly interesting. It is great the way that he manages to make a conversation between Hemingway and Goethe plausible. Fake News alert!

    • North Stand Chat

      advertising
      Join Date: Jul 2003
      Posts: Lots

        


    • #2222

      0 Not allowed!
      The little red chairs by Edna O Brien. Can't put it down
    • #2223
      U.T.A. Barry Izbak's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 2005
      Location
      Hove, actually
      Posts
      5,977


      0 Not allowed!
      Gimsons Kings and Queens of England

      Totally excellent
      I have not forgiven Lewes Council, or DeVeggie, or Archer, or Bellotti, or Stanley, or Bailey, or Whiteside, or Challis, or Saints and Spurs for that 0-0 in 1978.
      I don't get over things and I don't move on easily. OK?
    • #2224
      Olympic Gold Medallist Frutos's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2006
      Location
      Sussex
      Posts
      29,337


      0 Not allowed!
      A Short History of Byzantium by John Julius Norwich - very interesting it is too.
      REMF Quiz Champion 2016
    • #2225
      Members jakarta's Avatar
      Join Date
      May 2007
      Location
      Sullington
      Posts
      7,259


      0 Not allowed!
      After the Flood by John Nichol (Gulf War RAF Tornado Navigator famously shot down, captured and tortured by those lovely Iraqis).

      It is essentially a history of 617 Squadron RAF (The Dam Busters) in WWII after the Dams Raid.

      As opposed to the area bombing approach of the rest of Bomber Command, 617 basically became a precision night bombing unit with low level marking of targets for the rest of the war taking out V1/V2 sites etc..

      Aside from the recording of the raids, he has interviewed many the very few surviving 617 crew, I guess the last chance to do so.

      The courage of these men almost beggars belief, 55,000 of them were killed. Puts all the everyday bollocks that we live through into proper perspective.
    • #2226

      0 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Goldstone1976 View Post
      This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
      Looking for recommendations please - hard sci-fi/hard space opera and, I guess separately, credible time travel. Not fantasy.

      Good:

      Asimov
      Arthur C Clarke
      Alastair Reynolds

      Bad:

      Dune - wtf?
      The Culture Series by Iain M. Banks is pretty good for space opera, but you've probably read it before. Inherit the stars by James P Hogan is similar to Clarke.

      What's wrong with Dune?
    • #2227

      0 Not allowed!
      I'm now on the 4th of the 13 books from the Man Booker Int'l longlist.

      Fever Dream is a (thankfully) very short book by Argentine author Samanta Schweblin with the main character unconscious in hospital and in whose dreams she talks with a dead boy. It's extremely confusing and deliberately so, Schweblin has tried to write it as if it was a real nightmare where things happen that don't make sense, characters appear incongruously and repeating themes occur. I didn't much enjoy the book but I did admire the concept and delivery.

      Judas by Amos Oz is without doubt one of the most thought-provoking books I've read in a long time. Ostensibly a story of a student in Jerusalem who moves into a house to become an old man's companion in the late 50s, listening and debating with him. It's also a love story between a younger man and an older woman, a story of recent Israeli history, a minority plea for a two-state solution and a completely novel take on the idea of Judas as a true believer who never betrayed Jesus but rather had so much faith that he was the son of God, having seen so many miracles for himself, that he engineered the Crucifixion to prove the verity of Jesus. His suicide was therefore an act of despair rather than guilt. A quite stunning book.

      Currently reading Bricks and Mortar by Clemens Mayer. A collection of stories about life and attitudes in Leipzig from the mid 90s onwards focusing around the sex industry. A long read with the first chapter being completely in dialogue was knackering to get my head around who said what, to who and about whom but once I got in the groove it became easier.
      Last edited by Buzzer; 20-03-2017 at 16:53.
      My music blog: de-minimis music
    • #2228
      The Puff Pastry Hangman
      Join Date
      Feb 2012
      Posts
      814


      1 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Buzzer View Post
      This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
      Judas by Amos Oz is without doubt one of the most thought-provoking books I've read in a long time. Ostensibly a story of a student in Jerusalem who moves into a house to become an old man's companion in the late 50s, listening and debating with him. It's also a love story between a younger man and an older woman, a story of recent Israeli history, a minority plea for a two-state solution and a completely novel take on the idea of Judas as a true believer who never betrayed Jesus but rather had so much faith that he was the son of God, having seen so many miracles for himself, that he engineered the Crucifixion to prove the verity of Jesus. His suicide was therefore an act of despair rather than guilt. A quite stunning book.
      Thanks for this; think I'll read it.
      This is the one thing we didn't want to happen.
    • #2229
      Members
      Join Date
      Mar 2010
      Location
      Hove
      Posts
      15,474


      1 Not allowed!
      Quote Originally Posted by Goldstone1976 View Post
      This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
      Looking for recommendations please - hard sci-fi/hard space opera and, I guess separately, credible time travel. Not fantasy.

      Good:

      Asimov
      Arthur C Clarke
      Alastair Reynolds

      Bad:

      Dune - wtf?
      Neal Stephenson 'Anathem'. Brilliant novel, orbital mechanics, interstella travel, alternative planes of existence, lovely.
    • #2230
      Glory hunting since 1969 lawros left foot's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jun 2011
      Location
      Worthing
      Posts
      6,182


      0 Not allowed!
      I'm half way through the first Cadfael by Ellis Peters, I'm not sure yet, it's a bit 'wordy' if you know what I mean.
      You be glad you be Sussex born!

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •